Lexington officer is 19th to die in line of duty in Fayette

gkocher1@herald-leader.comMay 1, 2010 

Bryan J. Durman is the 19th law enforcement officer who died in the line of duty in Fayette County. He is the 13th Lexington police officer to have made the ultimate sacrifice.

Durman, 27, is the third Lexington police officer to have died after being struck by a hit-and-run driver. The other deaths happened in 1919 and 1935.

Here are the names of other Fayette County law enforcement officers who died in the line of duty:

• Joseph M. Angelucci, Nov. 23, 1988, a Fayette County deputy sheriff shot with his own gun by a mentally ill man he was trying to arrest.

• Roy H. Mardis, Aug. 23, 1985, a Lexington police officer accidentally shot by a state trooper during a manhunt for a murder suspect in a Mercer County cornfield.

• John L. Thomas, Nov. 21, 1967, a Fayette County police officer who was shot during a domestic-disturbance call on Richmond Avenue.

• Danny Redmon, Jan. 3, 1967, a Lexington police officer killed when his motorcycle and another vehicle collided on Winchester Road.

• Oscar Roberts, April 10, 1948, a Fayette County patrol officer shot while trying to make an arrest on a misdemeanor charge at Keeneland.

• James Banahan, Feb. 23, 1935, a Lexington police officer struck by a hit-and-run motorist while directing traffic on the Jefferson Street viaduct.

• Hebert Ray, Feb. 2, 1935, a U.S. deputy marshal shot while investigating rum runners at Fifth and Campbell streets.

• J.J. Estes, Jan. 19, 1927, a Lexington police officer shot while pursuing a bootlegger on Kenton Street.

• Clifford Hall, July 13, 1922, a Lexington police officer who crashed his motorcycle head-on into another vehicle.

• John Collopy, May 14, 1919, a Lexington police officer who was struck by a car on Walnut Street between Fourth and Fifth streets. The car was going about 25 mph and dragged Collopy about 100 feet.

• Preston Pullen, Oct. 30, 1918, a Lexington police officer who was shot while trying to apprehend a suspect in a grocery robbery.

• Michael Murphy, Nov. 6, 1907, a Lexington police officer shot while trying to make an arrest after an Election Day disturbance at a polling place on High Street and South Broadway.

• John J. Sullivan, May 22, 1897, a Lexington police officer, who was accidentally shot and killed from a weapon that fell from the pocket of another police officer.

• William W. Weathered, July 29, 1894, a Lexington police officer shot after trying to arrest a man for drunkenness near South Broadway and Bolivar Street.

• Thomas Donlon, May 12, 1888, a Lexington police officer shot by a man he was trying to arrest for being drunk in a stable on North Mill Street.

• C.N. Hendricks, Aug. 1, 1881, a Lexington police officer shot while trying to make an arrest in a saloon on Water Street.

• William Landers, July 30, 1870, a Kentucky Central Railroad peace officer who was stabbed with a saber while trying to quiet a crowd during a riot in front of the Phoenix Hotel.

• Joseph Beard, July 10, 1858, a Lexington city marshal stabbed with a Bowie knife while trying to break up a disturbance on Water Street. His assailant was arrested and then abducted from jail by a mob that took him to the courthouse and hanged him. The rope broke, and the assailant fell two stories, crushing his skull. Then the mob hanged him again, leaving his body dangling from the rope for hours.

Source: Herald-Leader archives and the "Fallen Heroes Room" of the Lexington Public Safety Museum.

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