Education notes: Dec. 26

December 26, 2012 

Awards/honors

■ The Special Libraries Association's Kentucky Chapter has named Mimi O'Malley, publishing specialist at The Learning House, recipient of the 2012 Larry Besant Professional Award, and Virginia Mattingly, cybrarian at the University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law, recipient of the 2012 Outstanding Chapter Member Award.

The Kentucky Chapter Professional Award recognizes an individual or group with a specific achievement in the field of librarianship or to the subject field in which they serve.

It was renamed this year to honor Larry Besant, a long standing member and contributor to Kentucky's SLA Chapter who passed away last spring. He retired as director of libraries at Camden-Carroll Library at Morehead State University in 2006.

During her tenure at The Learning House, O'Malley has been a publishing specialist, online learning assessment developer, course content writer, and professional development administrator.

■ The American Society of News Editors' High School Journalism Initiative has recognized a ninth-grade staff writer at Bryan Station High School for producing a thoughtful and well-rounded article.

Nadria Lavizzio's editorial "Battle of the Super Sexes," which appeared in the Defender News, was included in The National Edition, which presents teen-generated journalism from around the country. Opinions editor Felicia Laks, a senior, fine-tuned the piece before publication. In it, Nadria argues that super-heroines deserve equal billing. For more details, visit my.hsj.org.

Asbury Theological Seminary has been awarded a two-year $18,000 grant by the Dora Tes Basileas Foundation to establish a community garden on its campus. Slated to begin in spring 2013, the raised-bed community garden will feature 10-15 large common plots surrounded by 25 smaller individual plots that will be tended by members of the seminary community, including students, faculty and staff.

The community garden is an initiative of the Office of Global Community Formation, under the leadership of Marilyn Elliott, vice president for spiritual formation. Through the community garden, the Office of Global Community Formation and the Creation Care Community will teach gardening, composting, recycling, and bee handling as practical ways to steward God's creation. Additionally, the community garden will serve as a living laboratory to teach spiritual principles of personal devotion, discipleship and multicultural community building.

The Dora Tes Basileas Foundation was established in 2006 to support Protestant agencies and churches and theological education. Since its founding, the Foundation has contributed more than $136,000 to Asbury Seminary to support student scholarships and other initiatives.

■ Lindsey Wilson College has honored a retired Kentucky educator for his efforts to promote higher education in his community.

Dale Whitaker recently retired from a 31-year career at Rockcastle County High School in Mount Vernon and LWC honored his legacy by placing an engraved brick paver in the Lindsey Wilson Alumni & Friends Walkway, which connects the college's John B. Begley Chapel with the L.R. McDonald administration building.

Whitaker began teaching science and health in 1981 and then was a guidance counselor for the following 27 years.

■ Eleven middle schools participated in the Fayette County Academic League's annual quick-recall tournament Dec. 8. Winburn won the gold division with Lexington Traditional Magnet taking second place. Beaumont topped the blue division and Sayre School finished second.

Others competing in the best-records gold division were Edythe J. Hayes, Southern Middle and Seton Catholic School. Also in the blue group were Crawford, Morton, Christ the King and Lexington Christian Academy.

Winburn's team included Gus Carlson, Yoon Cho, Connie Cui, Zsombor Gal, Annie Griffith, Ronit Kar, Hye Jee Kim, Jodi Kirkner, Ashley Liu, Nisarg Patil, Zach Ross, Thirushan Wignakumar, Vicki Wong, Ben Xie and Amy Zhang.

Beaumont's team included James Brandewie, Maggie Cook-Allen, Chris Duncan, Brett Folsom, Carlie Fugate, Madi Halwes, Drew Herald, Kevin Hutcheson, Kelly Kral, Luke Porter, Rachel Seevers, Aidan Sturgill, Jacob Styer and Olivia Zastro.

In regular league play this fall, Winburn was undefeated in the varsity division, and LTMS tied for second. In the junior varsity group, Winburn finished first, Hayes was runner-up, and Beaumont came in third.

■ A pair of robot-building teams from Jessie Clark Middle School will compete in the KY-FLL state championships Feb. 2 at Western Kentucky University. They, along with three other teams in the Lexington/UK region, advanced after a strong showing in the FIRST LEGO League's Dec. 1 qualifier.

Regional results for the Jessie Clark teams moving on to state competition: Fourth place overall and first place in "Core Values: Gracious Professionalism" — Team General Leeagle: seventh-graders Ramsey Amoudi, Jonathan Browning, Tyler Ferry, Katya Kovatsenko, Ben Maddox, Erin Remley, Sebastian Rojas, Hadieh Zolfagheri and Hossein Zolfagheri.

Fifth place overall and first place in "Robot Design" — Team Herbieagle: eighth-graders Jason Burke, Hunter Delong, Cager Garrett, Sota Iida, Korbin Jackson, Brennan Johnson, Niklas Johnson, Brian Johnston, Brady Marshall and Austin Pedroche.

■ Two teams from Fayette County Public Schools are among the regional winners in the fall 2012 Stock Market Game. The Lafayette and Cassidy teams will receive certificates and T-shirts, and they are invited to the spring awards banquet in Louisville.

The group from Lafayette — sophomores Kate Heinonen, Nathan Sendlein and Michael Takahashi — was the top high school team in the east region with a portfolio valued at $104,606. In the elementary/middle school division, the Cassidy team finished in the south region with a portfolio valued at $103,180. These students, all from the fifth-grade Quest class, included Grace Cordle, McClaine Huffman, Isabel Pedersen and Sara Shadwick.

■ Lafayette High junior Coleman Stivers was awarded top honors in the 2012 Outstanding Farm Bureau Youth contest. He and the winner on the girls' side, Megan Harper of Marshall County, were recognized at Kentucky Farm Bureau's annual meeting Dec. 6 in Louisville.

Megan and Coleman, who also attends Locust Trace AgriScience Farm, were selected from 22 district finalists out of about 200 young people who competed in county and district contests during the past several months. Judges met with the students for personal interviews, awarding points for their leadership record, conversational ability and scholastic achievement. The two statewide winners each received a $2,000 college scholarship, an expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., on the KFB Congressional Tour in February, a luggage set and a watch.

With nearly 500,000 member families statewide, Kentucky Farm Bureau is the state's largest general farm organization.

Jackie Collier, director of alumni relations at Eastern Kentucky University, has been elected chair of the National Education Alumni Trust Board of Advisors.

The NEATrust, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1972 as the New England Alumni Trust, provides insurance products to constituents of member associations. More than 140 alumni associations comprise the NEATrust.

Collier is also a member of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education District III Board of Directors and serves as co-chair of sponsors and exhibitors for the organization's 2013 conference.

Bankole Thompson, a professor emeritus at Eastern Kentucky University who teaches part time in the College of Justice & Safety, has been invited by the Kofi Annan Foundation to serve on a commission formed to address drug trafficking and drug abuse in West Africa.

Thompson, a native of Sierra Leone and former judge of the United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone, an international war crimes tribunal, will serve on the Commission on the Impact of Drug Trafficking, Governance, Security and Development in West Africa.

Thompson joined the EKU faculty in 1995 and formerly served as dean of graduate studies.

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