Author advocates taking kids — even the little ones — hiking

mmeehan1@herald-leader.comMay 6, 2013 

  • IF YOU GO

    Jeff Alt signs Get Your Kids Hiking: How to Start Them Young and Keep it Fun

    When: 7 p.m. May 15

    Where: Joseph-Beth Booksellers, The Mall at Lexington Green.

    Cost: Free

    Info: (859) 273-2911 or Jeffalt.com

  • Nearby places to go hiking with children

    Central Kentucky Wildlife Refuge, 13 miles southwest of Danville in Boyle County. Ten trails that take a hiker through forest, past ponds and into clearings. CKWR.org.

    McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Lane, Lexington. This 26-acre nature sanctuary features trails past natural springs and more. (859) 225-4073. Mcconnellsprings.org.

    The Nature Preserve at Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, 3501 Lexington Road, Harrodsburg. Forty-mile trail system, including 13 multi-use trails, offers a broad range of distances and skill requirements. 1-800-734-5611. Shakervillageky.org

    Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, Jacks Creek Pike, Lexington. The 734-acre nature sanctuary has more than 10 miles of hiking trails that provide access to streams, meadows and woodlands characteristic of the area. (859) 272-6105.

    Red River Gorge Geological Area, near Slade, off Exit 33 of the Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway. This scenic natural area features sandstone arches and towering cliffs. (859) 745-3100. 1.usa.gov/YSQYny.

Author Jeff Alt didn't have to look far for inspiration for his book about hiking with children. He has two kids and started hiking with daughter Madison, 8, "right out of the gate." Son William, 5, also takes to the trail.

His hiking philosophy? If you start hiking with kids in a carrier when they are little, they will be more than ready to take to the trails on their own two feet as they grow older.

Alt will be signing his book Get Your Kids Hiking: How to Start Them Young and Keep It Fun (Beaufort Books Inc., $13.95) on May 15 at Joseph-Beth.

Alt is a member of the Outdoor Writers Association of America. He has walked the Appalachian Trail, has hiked the John Muir Trail with his wife, and he carried his daughter, when she was 21 months old, across a path in Ireland.

He wrote the book "because we as a nation have become lazy. Everything is at our fingertips now."

Life is so fast-paced and programmed, he said, that even kids get into a dull routine: school, home, school, home. They are not exposed to the sensory experiences that come with being out in nature. He said he hopes the book will help encourage families to get off the couch and hit the trail. "Kentucky is filled with wonderful opportunities" for hiking, he said. Those include the Red River Gorge and Big Bone Lick State Park.

The key to hiking with kids, he said, is letting them be the leaders. And, he said, parents need to focus on the experience — the butterflies on the trail, the mud on their shoes, the sounds of the forest. "That helps them engage in the outdoors. They can touch, feel and just see, learn and discover."

Distance is not a priority, he said.

"I let the child lead. If they stop, I stop," he said. "The child is showing me what they are interested in. You may only get a half a mile into the forest, but they are going to have so much fun they will want to do it again."

Alt, a speech pathologist, laid out the tips in his book to match the developmental stages of children. Hiking with elementary school-age children is different from hiking with teenagers.

He admits that getting teens to disconnect from their digital world to take a hike can be a challenge.

"With teenagers, you kind of have to intrigue them," he said. One way, he said, is to invite them to bring a friend along.

The right equipment is important, too, he said, no matter the age of the child. Food, water, a backpack and proper shoes are the basics.

There is another advantage to being on the trail and away from things, he said. It's a great time to talk to your kids.

"You can talk to them about some life lesson or ask them how they are feeling just before the go off to college," he said.


Nearby places to go hiking with children

Central Kentucky Wildlife Refuge, 13 miles southwest of Danville in Boyle County. Ten trails that take a hiker through forest, past ponds and into clearings. CKWR.org.

McConnell Springs, 416 Rebmann Lane, Lexington. This 26-acre nature sanctuary features trails past natural springs and more. (859) 225-4073. Mcconnellsprings.org.

The Nature Preserve at Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, 3501 Lexington Road, Harrodsburg. Forty-mile trail system, including 13 multiuse trails, offers a broad range of distances and skill requirements. 1-800-734-5611. Shakervillageky.org

Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, Jacks Creek Pike, Lexington. The 734-acre nature sanctuary has more than 10 miles of hiking trails that provide access to streams, meadows and woodlands characteristic of the area. (859) 272-6105.

Red River Gorge Geological Area, near Slade, off Exit 33 of the Bert T. Combs Mountain Parkway. This scenic natural area features sandstone arches and towering cliffs. (859) 745-3100. 1.usa.gov/YSQYny.


IF YOU GO

Jeff Alt signs Get Your Kids Hiking: How to Start Them Young and Keep it Fun,

When: 7 p.m. May 15

Where: Joseph-Beth Booksellers, The Mall at Lexington Green.

Cost: Free

Info: (859) 273-2911 or Jeffalt.com

Mary Meehan: (859) 231-3261. Twitter: @bgmoms. Blog: Bluegrassmoms.com.

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