Kentucky voices

Ky. Voices: IRS woes just symptom of bullying government

June 4, 2013 

Brian O'Leary of Wilmore is a business consultant in the electrical power industry.

Let us not be slow to recognize the natural, inbred tendency of governments everywhere to pillage, plunder, bully, and then offer protection to those who bow the knee and play the lobbying game.

Because bullying is the sorry history of governments the world over, America had to take a different and hitherto rather successful approach — bind the federal government with the chains of a constitution because, as George Washington wisely said, government is a force, like fire.

Since the progressive movement began over 100 years ago, the federal government has been busy sawing through these constitutional chains to increase its power at the high cost of citizen liberty.

The federal income tax, instituted in 1913, and the Internal Revenue Service continue to be, as they have always been, an engine of foreign war and domestic tyranny. U.S. presidents simply have not been able to resist the powerful temptation to call out their political enemies and let the IRS loose to harass them.

The Federal Reserve Bank, a private corporation, is the greatest counterfeiter in the world, and we all know that counterfeiting (legal or otherwise), is theft, and that it hurts lower-income earners the most. It effectively functions as a hidden tax on all, let alone a destroyer of free market economic predictability.

The federal government, from cost-reducing businesses owned by the Rockefellers (oil) and the Vanderbilts (transport), to IBM, Google and now Apple, through its unconstitutional antitrust division, as well as the IRS, has shown its hostility to big businesses that simply concentrate on serving the public instead of expensively lobbying (aka bribing).

Washington was right. No government is capable of avoiding the powerfully corrupting temptation of properly managing the IRS, printing currency with the private federal bank, or interfering in lawful commerce with its antitrust or other business regulations (usually politically motivated extortions).

The IRS and the Federal Reserve Bank may have been sold to the electorate in 1913 as a modest tax only on the rich, and a stabilizer of the economy, respectively. They have miserably failed on each count.

Besides, it's not many years since total federal revenue from all sources, including federal income tax, was no greater than today's total take from other than income tax. So, in a frugal government, we don't even need the IRS.

And ever since its inception, the Federal Reserve has orchestrated politically motivated bubbles and bursts on a grand scale. Sure, with fully diversified free enterprise banking, and real money (usually the freely accepted gold and silver, and legally redeemable certificates), business collapses would occur here and there and from time to time, through imprudent investment.

But it takes a central, government-instituted monopoly bank or cartel of banks to orchestrate frequent, nationwide, simultaneous collapses and citizen bailouts.

Also, the current non-recovery would not be sustained in a free enterprise system (commonly known to progressives as an economic miracle).

We know, when they are caught succumbing to all these temptations, today's president and his staff think it's OK to plead that the Obama administration is at no time aware of what the Obama administration is doing.

Even though we don't believe these coincidences could all simultaneously favor the administration, we do feel that the government is now too big to succeed and needs to be reduced in size and scope.

So, for a start, if only to begin dousing this fiery federal force, let's get rid of the federal income tax and its shameless, plundering IRS and abolish the inflating and thereby also plundering, Federal Reserve Bank.

Brian O'Leary of Wilmore is a business consultant in the electrical power industry.

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