Landlords enter into conciliation agreements in discrimination complaints

vhoneycutt@herald-leader.comJune 22, 2013 

Landlords in Nicholasville, Morehead and Mount Sterling have entered into conciliation agreements on discrimination complaints, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights announced Friday.

Conciliation agreements are similar to settlements and are negotiated by commission investigative and legal staff. In a press release, the Commission outlined the three cases:

■ The Lexington Fair Housing Council, which tests for fair housing violations, alleged that Long's Trailer Park in Morehead discriminated on the basis of family status. The council claimed the trailer park denied families with children from residing on its property. Long's Trailer Park's owner denied all violations of the law, but as part of the agreement, trailer park officials affirmed the trailer park will not discriminate against people and will comply with civil rights laws, have agreed to report any complaints of housing discrimination to the commission and have agreed to undergo fair housing compliance training.

■ In a Mount Sterling case, Erica Leiva alleged the Mount Sterling Housing Authority discriminated against her because she was a Hispanic woman and said the landlord had referred to her as "you people." The housing authority, which had terminated her lease, denied all violations of the law. The housing authority said Leiva had allowed the person against whom she had a restraining order for domestic abuse to be present in her apartment as a guest all evening before police were called for a report of violence. In the conciliation agreement, Leiva agreed to abide by the lease terms. The Housing Authority agreed to provide a written apology to Leiva, to make the Violence against Women Act notice available to all tenants, to abide by fair housing law, to undergo compliance training and to submit to monitoring by the commission.

■ In Nicholasville, Leisa Riley alleged that property landlords Sue Salyer and David and Kathy Bates discriminated against her on the basis of disability regarding fees for a service animal. The landlords denied all violations of the law but agreed to comply with fair housing laws, agreed to compensate Riley in the amount of $6,000, and agreed to undergo fair housing compliance training and compliance monitoring by the commission for three years, according to the press release.

Valarie Honeycutt Spears: (859) 231-3409. Twitter:@vhspears

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