Kentucky women's soccer picked second in SEC East

July 23, 2013 

University of Kentucky women's soccer coach Jon Lipsitz

The University of Kentucky women's soccer team was picked to finish second in the Eastern Division this season in a vote of Southeastern Conference coaches announced Tuesday.

The Wildcats' predicted finish is their highest under Coach Jon Lipsitz, who is entering his fifth season at UK.

Reigning SEC champion Florida was picked to repeat in the East, receiving 89 points in the voting and 11 of the 14 first-place votes. Kentucky and Tennessee were next with 71 points each, with the Volunteers getting the other three first-place votes.

Defending Western Division champion Texas A&M was picked to finish first again, receiving 91 points and 13 first-place votes.

Lipsitz led UK to its first-ever NCAA Tournament win in 2012. Nine of the 11 starters return from that team. Kentucky finished third in the East last season, going 14-7-1 overall and 8-4-1 in league play.

The coaches predicted Texas A&M would win the conference title, giving the Aggies eight championship votes. Florida received the other six.

UK's players report to Lexington to open pre-season practice on Aug. 6. The Wildcats open the 2013 on Aug. 23 at Wake Forest.

SEC coaches' poll

SEC champion: Texas A&M 8 votes, Florida 6.

Eastern Division

Florida (11) 89

Kentucky 71

Tennessee (3) 71

Missouri 56

South Carolina 42

Georgia 30

Vanderbilt 26

Western Division

Texas A&M (13) 91

LSU (1) 67

Auburn 62

Alabama 59

Mississippi 52

Arkansas 33

Mississippi State 21

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