Former UK pitcher Andrew Albers to make his major-league debut Tuesday

August 5, 2013 

WBC Canada Mexico Baseball

Canada's Andrew Albers (27) throws against Mexico during a World Baseball Classic game, Saturday, March 9, 2013, in Phoenix. Canada won 10-3.

MATT YORK — ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former University of Kentucky standout Andrew Albers is scheduled to make his major-league debut Tuesday night when the Minnesota Twins face the Royals in Kansas City.

The 27-year-old lefty, who replaced Scott Diamond in the starting rotation, was called up on Saturday. He told MLB.com that he was glad his debut didn't come right off the bat.

"I'm glad I've got a couple of days to take in the atmosphere, get (acclimated) to the club and those good things," he said.

Even though this will be Albers' first major-league appearance, the Canadian has pitched against top hitters in the World Baseball Classic.

"You realize that they're human, too, and they can get out as well," Albers said. "That's the big thing — you've got to come up and do what got you here, pound the zone and throw strikes and be aggressive."

Albers went 11-5 with a 2.86 ERA in 22 starts at Triple-A Rochester this year, and though he doesn't have a blazing fastball, he managed 116 strikeouts in 1321⁄3 innings.

"He put himself on our radar," Twins GM Terry Ryan said. "You can't overlook what he's accomplished down there every time he pitches. He has a knack of being able to produce quality innings. He's got just enough funk, he's got location, he's got deception, he's got the stomach and the heart."

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