Inflation hits tooth fairy

Playground politics: Quarter doesn't cut it anymore

Associated PressAugust 31, 2013 

Halloween aging5 ILLUS.jpg

300 dpi 1 col x 2.25 in / 47x57 mm / 160x194 pixels Chris Ware color Halloween illustration an adult trick-or-treater who has misplaced his candy. Lexington Herald-Leader 2005

KEYWORDS: krthalloween halloween aging aging5 costume trick or treat treating safety age tooth fairy dentist kids parents parenting fantasy imagination imaginary pretend father children angel dientes joven krtfeatures features krtholiday holiday krtnational national krtfamily family krthobby hobby krt aspecto aspectos illustration ilustracion grabado seguridad vispera todos los santos traje lx contributor coddington ware 2005 krt2005 memory

CHRIS WARE — KRT

Days of finding a quarter under your pillow are long gone. The Tooth Fairy no longer leaves loose change.

Kids this year are getting an average of $3.70 per lost tooth, a 23 percent jump over last year's rate of $3. That's a 42 percent spike from 2011, when the Tooth Fairy gave $2.60 per tooth, according to a new survey by payment processor Visa Inc., released Friday with an update of the company's Tooth Fairy personal finance app.

Part of the reason for the sharp rise: Parents don't want their kids to be the ones at the playground who received the lowest amount.

"A kid who got a quarter would wonder why their tooth was worth less than the kid who got $5," says Kit Yarrow, a consumer psychologist and professor at Golden Gate University.

To avoid that, Brian and Brittany Klems asked friends and co-workers what they were giving their kids. The Klems, who have three daughters and live in Cincinnati, settled on giving their 6-year-old daughter Ella $5 for the first tooth that fell out, and $1 for any others. They say that $5 was enough without going overboard. They didn't want other families to think they were giving too much.

Then Ella found out that one of her friends received $20 for a tooth.

"I told her that the Tooth Fairy has only so much money for every night, and that's how she decides to split up the money," says Brian Klems, 34, a parenting blogger and author of Oh Boy, You're Having a Girl: A Dad's Survival Guide to Raising Daughters.

Confused about what to give?

Ask other parents what they're giving, says Jason Alderman, a senior director of global financial education at Visa. That can at least get you in the ballpark of what your kids' friends are getting, he says. Alderman gave his two kids $1 a tooth.

"I think we were on the cheap side," he says.

As part of the company's personal finance education program, Visa offers a downloadable Tooth Fairy Calculator app that will give you an idea of how much parents in your age group, income bracket and education level are giving their kids, says Alderman. The newly updated app is available for iPhones and iPads on iTunes, and the calculator is available on the Facebook apps page.

How much kids are getting from the Tooth Fairy depends on where they live. Kids in the Northeast are getting the most, according to the Visa study, at $4.10 per tooth. In the West and South, kids received $3.70 and $3.60 per tooth, respectively. Midwestern kids received the least, at $3.30 a tooth. About a third of all parents surveyed say the Tooth Fairy left a dollar or less.

Visa randomly sampled 3,000 households by phone in July. The survey results are based on the 1,000 of those households that included a child younger than 13.


ONLINE

Tooth Fairy Calculator: https://apps.facebook.com/449594221747991/

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