Tom Eblen: Learn how to code and shape the future

Herald-Leader Columnist,Tom EblenNovember 11, 2013 

Tom Eblen

Americans have always understood the link between literacy and getting ahead. The better you could read and write the English language, the better your chances for success.

But in the 21st century, where virtually every aspect of life involves some kind of digital technology, there is a lot of economic opportunity for people who also have another kind of literacy: code.

Code is the foundation of computer science, the instructions that programmers use to get computers and other digital devices to do what they want them to do. Who will shape the future of a technology-driven global economy? The people who know how to write code.

That is the basic message of the nonprofit organization Code.org, which is sponsoring a initiative called the Hour of Code to bring a taste of basic code instruction to every school during Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 9-15.

So far, Code.org reports that more than 9,800 events for more than 1.56 million students are planned that week in 141 countries. Students don't have to have special math knowledge or aptitude to participate. They don't even have to have a computer. For more information, go to: Csedweek.org.

One Lexington group that has embraced this initiative is Awesome Inc., an incubator for high-tech entrepreneurs. Its offices at 348 East Main Street have provided shared workspace for 50 startup companies over the past six years, as well as meeting and educational space. It also houses the Kentucky Entrepreneurs Hall of Fame.

Brian Raney, a co-founder of Awesome Inc., said about 10 volunteers from among the 15 companies now housed at the incubator plan to use curricula developed by Code.org to teach an hour of code instruction at 10 schools during that week.

Raney already has signed up Rockcastle County High School and four Fayette County public schools: Tates Creek High School, Dixie Magnet Elementary, the Learning Center at Linlee and the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) Academy.

He said Awesome Inc. will accept five more schools on a first-come, first-served basis, with preference given to schools that include the entire student body in the program. The session will include hands-on exercises, including some actual programming for student groups that have computers. There is a $100 reservation fee to cover instructors' expenses.

Schools interested in having Awesome Inc. facilitate their participation in the Hour of Code can apply at: Awesomeincu.com/hourofcode.html.

"I honestly think we'll have a lot more demand than the 10 schools we can handle," Raney said.

"The idea is to teach the basics of what coding is all about," he said. "To learn to think like a programmer — logical thinking, problem-solving. Kids pick that up so fast."

Raney sees the Hour of Code as a great way to interest young people in computer programming and the career opportunities it offers, which are becoming more abundant, varied and lucrative every day.

His own interest in programming led him to start Apax Software, which designs websites and develops mobile applications, such as Keeneland's new Race Day app for iPhone, iPad and Android.

Raney said that getting more people to learn code is key to growing Kentucky's technology and entrepreneurial economies, which is a goal of Awesome Inc.

This summer, Awesome Inc. began offering a series of one-day "crash courses" in coding for web development and mobile apps. So far, 140 students —ranging in age from 9 to their mid-60s — have taken those classes, which cost $50 to $100. More information: Awesomeincu.com.

"Our goal is to teach 500 people to code by the summer of 2014," he said.

Raney is especially excited about the Hour of Code program because it will show young people that while coding may be the language of today's technology geniuses, you don't have to be a genius to learn to write code.

"Software is running everything," he said. "If you can understand how that software works and how to manipulate it, you're going to be able to do so much. The people who learn how to code are going to shape the future."

Tom Eblen: (859) 231-1415. Email: teblen@herald-leader.com. Twitter: @tomeblen. Blog: tomeblen.bloginky.com

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