Cartoons to the editor

Letters to the editor: Nov. 17

November 17, 2013 

  • Special-election letters

    Letters about candidates in the Dec. 10 special election for the 13th Senate District are limited to 150 words and must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2. Letters from candidates, their campaign staffs and family members will not be published.

Young girl's life worth as much as that of policeman

A black man accidentally hits a cop who is standing without any reflective gear in the dark, on a narrow street. He goes to the penitentiary for manslaughter.

A driver who hits a 12-year-old girl lawfully in the crosswalk in the afternoon and who claims the sun was in her eyes goes scot free.

Sorry, if the sun is blinding you, use far more caution than normal to avoid killing a 12-year-old. To proceed knowing that you cannot see is called reckless conduct and it is punishable as homicide. Or could it be that a cop's life has value and a little girl's has none?

There is something fundamentally wrong with our so-called criminal justice system when offenders are treated so disparately and victims are valued not as people, but for their status.

Sally Wasielewski

Attorney

Lexington


Tea Party anti-libraries

The Taliban bombs schools for girls and even shoots the girl students. The Taliban runs madrassa schools for boys where the only curriculum is memorizing verses from the Koran.

The Taliban does not believe in students learning math, science, history and critical thinking.

An educated population that can think for itself is bad for business when you want to tell everyone else what to think.

It is not surprising that the Tea Party has targeted public libraries in Kentucky as a menace to their way of totalitarian thinking. The movement is trying to use the fine print in two old Kentucky laws to justify the defunding.

They don't want to be taxed for anything that benefits everyone. Instead they want to hoard every penny they earn. They don't realize that the educational, financial and transportation infrastructure provided by government made it possible for them to earn those pennies.

Lexington has wonderful public libraries; books on any subject are available to borrow and read. Librarians are there to help patrons find any book. I think the librarians would suggest that everyone in the Tea Party check out a copy of Silas Marner. If they actually read the book, they would realize that their way of thinking is not new. In the novel, published a century and a half ago, Silas Marner found out that he was much happier when he changed from being a lonely money hoarder to being a person who reached out and helped others.

Kevin Kline

Lexington


Lincoln mural learning

Bravo to the people involved with making the Eduardo Kobra mural happen on the back of the Kentucky Theatre building on Water Street. My family and I went a half-dozen times to watch them paint. Not only did it provide a unique glimpse of a world-renowed artist at work, but so many other small teaching moments for an eight-year-old child, about Abraham Lincoln, the Lincoln Memorial, how to show perspective, Brazil, Portugese, graffiti, safety precautions and many more too numerous to list.

Public art is a gift that keeps giving and Lexington has a giant Technicolor 16th president to enjoy for years to come.

Meredith S. Walker

Lexington


Health care's false face

A new federal regulation requires any company that provides group health insurance to also fund coverage for drugs such as Ella (Ulipristal), commonly referred to as the week-after pill.

Hobby Lobby is being threatened with fines exceeding $1 million per day for refusing to fund the drugs. Many people, even if they are not religious, realize that killing innocent human life is wrong.

The Democrats are responsible for pushing the Affordable Care Act on the country, which includes this mandate. In 2007, speaking to Planned Parenthood, Barack Obama said that "reproductive care is essential, it is basic care. So it is at the center and at the heart of the plan that I propose."

It is no surprise then that President Obama appointed former Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius to head the Department of Health and Human Services. As governor, Sebelius was a vocal defender of Planned Parenthood and received donations from late-term abortionist George Tiller. Her unyielding support for abortion caused Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann to call on Sebelius to stop receiving communion until she disavowed her support for the "serious moral evil of abortion."

When the mandate is fully implemented Jan. 1, it will effectively shut down any company that refuses, because of religious conviction, to fund drugs that it considers to be abortion-inducing This is a direct hit to religious freedom, which is protected by the Constitution. The false face of providing health care for all is being used to gain absolute control over our health system and therefore our very lives.

Diana Maldonado

Right to Life of Central Kentucky

Lexington


Housing discrimination

Why are so many apartment complexes now denying those with Section 8 subsidies? Guaranteed federal money is not good for their pockets? Do they have something they don't want the inspectors to find out?

So many are quck to say that it ruins the image of the neighborhood. How? By putting families in a place that is safe?

Many on Section 8 have jobs but don't make enough to cover their rent by themselves. Some are single parents trying to survive on meager allowances from federal assistance. Why are they being thrown out to the streets?

If it's about money, I could understand. But it's about discrimination based on where the money comes from. If families or single persons pay their rent out of pocket it is not questioned. So why are Section 8 renters treated unfairly for how their rent is paid?

A Section 8 renter is under more rules and restrictions than regular renters and is inspected as well. Section 8 renters cannot move without sending notices to their aid worker and landlord. Regular renters get no inspections and can move when and if they want, with no consequences if they are not found.

Lisa Dansby

Lexington


Civility, please

Will it ever end? I'm a senior citizen member of the Tea Party and I am so tired of being called names.

I have white hair, four grandchildren and am a retired kindergarten teacher. But listen to the names associated with me: racist, Nazi, anarchist, destroyer, terrorist, extortionist and arsonist. Lovely words.

Wouldn't anyone rush to parlay with people who use words like that? These are all words used by the Democrats. Where is the civility that President Barack Obama said we must get back to? What happened to, "I disagree with what you say but I respect your right to have opinions that are different from mine" without flame-throwing?

When did it become a terrible thing to uphold the Constitution; to expect the federal government to balance the budget as we, as individuals and families, have to do; to support our service men and women and our vets; to actually represent the people?

The president and Congress are not our bosses, we are theirs. It's time for all of them to grow up, be adults and save our country from the profligacy of overspending and calling anyone we disagree with vile names. Isn't that what you hear on a playground?

Nancy Davidson

Georgetown


Do math on health care

I was reading in the Herald-Leader how Kentucky's enrollment in the Affordable Care Act was going so much better than the federal enrollment. Well, this is true. It is going much quicker than the federal website catastrophe. But, in actuality it is not doing so well, when you examine the figures.

The Oct. 22 article said 272,339 individuals had visited the website, out of an estimated 640,000 Kentuckians eligible. There had been 241,000 individuals who had entered their information and 15,000 successfully approved applications, in 21 days.

It may continue at this pace, or it may not, but at this rate of approval it will take 2.5 years to get 640,000 approved. That will be just a tad past the March 31, 2014 deadline. Even with the approval rate increasing by 25 percent in each of the next eight 21-day periods, Kentucky will only have approximately 388,000 individuals enrolled.

This will leave over a quarter million individuals not enrolled and subject to penalties.

From what I have read, Kentucky has one of the best rates of Obamacare registration in the nation. If all the states and the federal programs matched Kentucky, there will be multiple millions of individuals subject to penalties. I applaud such a well-planned operation.

J. D. Miniard

Nicholasville


Race official's first job

My heart goes out to the young runner who received bib number 666 and was unable to change that number.

No athlete should have to suffer similarly. This young athlete was caught between her strong religious convictions and her ardent desire to race.

As a competitive runner and a certified USA Track & Field official and coach, my suggestion is for coaches and athletes to be both courteous and persistent, and start by identifying the most appropriate official for any given situation.

Just as runners feel anxiety about competition, and determination to do well, officials feel anxiety about the myriad things that can go wrong during a competition.

Athletes who are running hard toward the finish deserve our full attention. Our prime rule is safety first, so a problem that is not a safety issue has a lower priority than appropriate officiating for a competition already in progress.

With more than two hours remaining before her race, the athlete and her coach had time to find the official responsible for registration.

I know official Gordon Bocock and am confident that, barring a prior commitment to athletes already racing, he would offer assistance.

However, he was on his way to the finish chute. That was like interrupting an air-traffic controller to ask for help changing your seat assignment while he was busy directing an airplane to land.

The request wasn't the problem. The problem was timing, and identifying the appropriate official.

Martha Victoria Rosett Lutz

Lexington


Scout defunding wrong

The United Way's suspension of funds to the Boy Scouts violates its own principle of treating everyone the same. It labels gay sexuality prepubescent.

Society understands all adult men and women, gay or straight, as having powerful sex drives. Civilization regulates sexual behavior to draw strength and energy from the fire of sexual attraction while at the same time limiting the damage from uncontrolled sexual behavior.

Every person is warned by Dear Abby not to put themselves in compromising situations when confronted with temptations that may have undesirable consequences for many, including the denigration of the very idea of sexual intimacy.

We have guidelines for reining in the power of sexual attraction in the workplace. Heterosexual men do not seek out Girl Scout troop master positions or girls' locker room access as coaches.

Such men would be considered at best ignorant and not self-aware and more likely ornery and obscene. A gay scoutmaster is an analogous situation.

Treating everyone the same means assuming gays and straights have the same level of sexual drive and attraction with all the same benefits and dangers.

Treating gay scoutmasters differently is asserting that the gay guy's sexual drive is less significant, less consequential, a lower level of what it means to be human, not worth regulating.

This, in turn, makes sexual relations and intimacy for all individuals and society less valuable and of far less consequence. People, gay or straight, become more hollow.

J. Larry Hood

Nicholasville


Special-election letters

Letters about candidates in the Dec. 10 special election for the 13th Senate District are limited to 150 words and must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2. Letters from candidates, their campaign staffs and family members will not be published.

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