Fayette school cancels two off days to help make up snow days

vhoneycutt@herald-leader.comFebruary 10, 2014 

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    Follow reporter Valarie Honeycutt Spears' Twitter feed @vhspears. For updates from Monday night's Fayette County Board of Education meeting.

The Fayette County School Board voted Monday night to hold school on Presidents Day, which is next week, and March 21 to make up for days lost to snow.

With Monday's cancellation of classes, the district has had 10 snow days this academic year. It has been 20 years since Fayette County Public Schools has hit that mark, spokeswoman Lisa Deffendall said.


See the revised school calendar here

Kentucky school districts are required to provide the equivalent of at least 177 six-hour instructional days — 1,062 hours — during the 2013-14 school year.

With the addition of Presidents Day and March 21, a Friday, as snow makeup days, the last day of school would be June 6, a Friday, Deffendall said. The district already has said that June 9 to 13 have been set aside as makeup days if needed.

Mary Wright, the district's chief operating officer, said there were no plans to use spring break, set for March 31 to April 4, for makeup days.

The Kentucky Department of Education plans to ask lawmakers to file legislation to allow Education Commissioner Terry Holliday to grant as many as 10 disaster days to school districts that have missed and made up 20 days as a result of adverse weather, spokeswoman Nancy Rodriguez said last week.

Valarie Honeycutt Spears: (859) 231-3409. Twitter: @vhspears.

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