College basketball roundup: Boston College upsets No. 1 Syracuse

February 19, 2014 

Boston College Syracuse Basketball

Boston College players celebrated after defeating No. 1 Syracuse in overtime Wednesday. Syracuse had been undefeated, while Boston College came into the game with only six wins.

KEVIN RIVOLI — AP

Olivier Hanlan and Patrick Heckmann hit 3-pointers in overtime, Lonnie Jackson made four straight free throws in the final 26 seconds, and lowly Boston College stunned top-ranked Syracuse 62-59 on Wednesday night, ending the host Orange's unbeaten season.

Boston College (7-19, 3-10 Atlantic Coast Conference), which had lost five straight, rallied from a 13-point second-half deficit to pull off the improbable upset, leaving No. 3 Wichita State as the only unbeaten team in Division I.

The Eagles came to town with heavy hearts and a good dose of determination. Longtime basketball media contact and sports information assistant Dick Kelley died last week after a two-year battle with ALS. His funeral was Tuesday and the Eagles, who often visited his apartment, were wearing "DK" patches on their uniforms.

Syracuse, which had won its last two games by a combined three points, shot a season-low 32.2 percent from the field including going 2 of 12 from 3-point range.

CJ Fair had 20 points and 11 rebounds for Syracuse.

No. 2 Florida 71, Auburn 66: Patric Young made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left and Auburn threw the ball away on the ensuing inbounds play.

With No. 1 Syracuse losing Florida could move in the top spot for the first time since the 2006-07 season.

The victory was Florida's school-record 18th in a row and it kept the Gators (24-2, 13-0) perfect in Southeastern Conference play.

Young led the Gators with 17 points and had seven rebounds.

No. 7 Cincinnati 77, Central Florida 49: Sean Kilpatrick hit six 3-pointers and scored 23 points as Cincinnati dominated host Central Florida.

The Bearcats (24-3, 13-1 American Athletic) have won 17 of 18 going into their conference showdown with No. 11 Louisville on Saturday.

No. 3 Wichita 88, Loyola-Chicago 74: Fred VanVleet scored 22 points on perfect shooting as Wichita State remained the last unbeaten team in major college basketball.

The Shockers used an 11-2 run early in the second half to help close out the Ramblers. Cleanthony Early scored 18 points as Wichita State became the 19th school to begin a season with 28 straight victories.

VanVleet was 6 for 6 from the field and made all of his 10 free throws.

No. St. Louis 89, George Mason 85 (OT): Jordair Jett scored 24 of his 25 points after halftime and Rob Loe hit two key 3-pointers in overtime as St. Louis escaped with its 18th straight win.

The Billikens (24-2, 11-0 Atlantic-10), played as a Top 10 team for the first time since Dec. 29, 1964.

No. 24 Ohio State,76, Northwestern 60: LaQuinton Ross of the Buckeyes scored 16 points before being ejected after a scuffle.

The fracas late in the game delayed play for several minutes while the officials deliberated penalties for the players. Northwestern's Nikola Cerina also was ejected. The teams shot 10 free throws as a result of the shoving match.

Missouri 67, Vanderbilt 64: Jordan Clarkson scored 21 points, including all 11 free-throw attempts, to lead host Missouri.

Earnest Ross added 16 points for the Tigers, who survived an off-game from top scorer Jabari Brown, who was held to nine points on 3 for 11 shooting.

LSU 92, Mississippi State 81: Freshmen Jarell Martin and Jordan Mickey combined for 39 points to lead LSU past visiting Mississippi State.

Martin, who was 8-of-11 from the field, scored a season-high 20 points. He also grabbed eight rebounds. Mickey, who made a season-high 11 foul shots, finished with 19 points.

Union 82, Bryan 73: Deante Johnson led the way with 21 points as the host Bulldogs clinched the Appalachian Athletic Conference regular season championship, their first league title since winning the Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference crown in 1971-72.

Women

No. 3 Louisville 81, Houston 62: Sara Hammond scored 17 points, and Shoni Schimmel added 15 to lead host Louisville.

Schimmel, the school's second all-time leading scorer behind Angel McCoughtry, topped 2,000 points for her career and helped the Cardinals (26-2, 14-1 American Athletic Conference) improve to 16-0 at home.

Transylvania 101, Hanover 85: Jordin Fender led the way with 22 points as Transy ran its record to 22-2.

The Pioneers, who scored 52 points in the paint, outrebounded Hanover 65-34 with Katelyn Smith grabbing 11 and Madisen Webb snaring 10 to go with her 19 points.

Union 69, Bryan 66: Hayley Perkins scored 20 points as host Union secured the No. 2 seed in the Appalachian Athletic Conference tournament next week.

Bryan took the lead with 10-1 run late in the game, but Perkins got a basket and Lydia Nash hit two free throws in the final minute.

More damage to IU arena, but no imminent danger

An inspection of the roof and ceiling at Assembly Hall on Wednesday found more places where melting snow and ice had loosened steel plates inside Indiana University's basketball arena.

Athletic director Fred Glass said workers found two or three additional spots where the plates appeared to be damaged, but were in no imminent danger of falling.

Glass said the building was safe and that he planned to attend the women's game against Michigan on Wednesday night.

Tuesday night's men's game against Iowa was postponed after an eight-foot long, 14-inch wide, 50-pound metal plate fell from the building's ceiling about six hours before tipoff. The debris damaged some seats in the northwest corner.

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