'South Park: The Stick of Truth' makes the TV show seem tame

Associated PressMarch 13, 2014 

Game Review South Park

South Park: The Stick of Truth brings in nearly every character from the series' 17-year run, but it's far more shocking than the TV show ever was.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

  • VIDEO GAME REVIEW

    'South Park: The Stick of Truth'

    Platforms: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC

    Publisher: UbiSoft

    Developer: UbiSoft

    ESRB rating: M

Remember when South Park debuted on Comedy Central in 1997? Remember how shocking the cursing, toilet humor and black comedy seemed?

Take that level of shock and multiply it by, oh, 20 and you'll have some idea of what you should expect from South Park: The Stick of Truth, the new video game written by series creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. Even fans of the movie South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut might be taken aback by the level of raunch on display here.

The curse words are un-bleeped. There's a sex act that makes the notorious "Hot Coffee" scene in Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas look like something off the Disney Channel. There's a cringe-inducing scenario set in an abortion clinic. And more.

Like its cable TV counterpart, The Stick of Truth gleefully tackles gun control, racism, sexism and pedophilia. If you're not a South Park fan, by all means avoid it. Even if you're a fan, there are moments that will make you say "ick" — even as you're laughing at the game's audacity.

Your character is the new kid in town. Cartman, grand wizard of the Kingdom of Kupa Keep (yes, the KKK), invites you on a quest to recover the titular stick from a tribe of elves, led by Kyle and Stan. The war between the two gangs evolves into something more dangerous, though, once aliens invade and unleash a plague of Nazi zombies. The ensuing romp reels in almost every character from the cartoon's 17-year run, from regulars like Kenny and Butters to guest stars including Mr. Hankey and Jesus.

The gameplay was designed by Obsidian Entertainment, the California studio known for the role-playing games Fallout: New Vegas and Dungeon Siege III. The Stick of Truth is RPG lite. You get to create the new kid from scratch, building from scores of facial features, clothing items and accessories. As the game progresses, you get more resilient armor and more dangerous weapons. You also learn increasingly effective magic spells that, true to form, typically involve flatulence.

Whenever you encounter an enemy, the screen switches to battle mode, in which you and one partner take turns attacking and casting spells at the bad guys. Most actions, whether offensive or defense, require pressing a button at a certain time to achieve maximum power. The combat recalls Nintendo's Paper Mario and Mario & Luigi series, and demands more strategy than you might expect.

Those Nintendo franchises have produced some of the funniest games on the market, so perhaps there's something about the turn-based RPG that lends itself to comedy. In any case, over the 12 hours I played The Stick of Truth, I found myself laughing dozens of times — sometimes at its broad slapstick, other times at more subtle gags.

For example, there are hundreds of collectible items hidden in South Park, and nearly every one has a joke attached. (The profane text accompanying "Phil Collins' Oscar" indicates that Parker and Stone are still bugged about losing the 1999 best original song trophy to him.) Some of the targets are outdated (what have Al Gore and Rob Schneider done to anyone lately?). But that could be the result of the game's long, turbulent development history.

South Park has always been aware of video-game culture, and some of the funniest elements of The Stick of Truth play off familiar tropes from the likes of Call of Duty, Final Fantasy and Skyrim. Two-thirds of the way through the game, a tremendous joke about Canada is the cleverest twist I've seen in an AAA game in years. But even before then, this game is packed with so much comedy that you'll forgive some uninspired gameplay. Just don't play in front of your kids. Or your parents.

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