Tom Eblen: Lexington brothers win international architectural design contest

Herald-Leader columnistApril 13, 2014 

The email from London looked genuine, but it arrived before dawn on April 1.

"Everybody we told thought it was an April Fool's joke," said Patrick Morgan, a young architect from Lexington. "I don't think Jha D believed me. She just wanted to go back to sleep when I called her at 6:30 in the morning."

The email was from Building Trust International, a London-based charity that works to improve life in developing countries with good shelter design. It told Morgan that he, his brother, Simon, and his architecture school classmate, Jhanéa "Jha D" Williams, had won the organization's fifth international design competition, to create a mobile health clinic for use in Southeast Asia.

Their design was chosen from among more than 200 entries by student and professional architects. The best student entry won a small cash prize. "Our prize is that it actually gets built and used," Simon said.

There were nine professional runners-up in the competition, from India, South Korea, Australia, Italy, Denmark, Ireland and Malaysia.

"It's still a shock that we won," Patrick said.

Patrick, 26, has a master's degree in architecture from the University of Pennsylvania and works for Interface Studio Architects in Philadelphia. Simon, 24, has a master's in public health from Columbia University and works for a firm in Washington, D.C., analyzing health policy.

The brothers have been interested in design and construction since they were boys, helping their parents, John Morgan and Linda Carroll, restore historic houses in downtown Lexington.

"That was quite a bit of it," Patrick said with a laugh. "Having a wheelbarrow in my hands at 6 months old."

For their Eagle Scout service projects, they built a patio and landscaping at St. Paul Catholic Church.

As an architect with the Lexington firm Thought Space, Patrick designed the interior of an early 1800s cottage his parents restored on East Third Street. It is beside the offices of their company, Morgan Worldwide, a consulting firm that specializes in reducing the environmental impact of mining.

Patrick said he saw Building Trust International's Moved to Care competition advertised on an architecture blog and suggested developing an entry with his brother and Williams, who works for the architecture and planning firm Sasaki Associates in Boston.

"This sounded perfect for what Simon and I wanted to do together," he said. "We had always been thinking about trying to work together on projects that would combine our skill sets."

The idea is that health care services and education can be more effectively delivered in rural areas by bringing small clinics to people rather than asking them to travel to clinics for medical treatment, vaccinations and hygiene education.

"We had been talking about doing something like this for two years," Simon said. "I studied in South Africa as an undergraduate, and I thought something like this was a much better way to deliver care."

Patrick said several things about their design seemed to impress the judges. It is easily portable, folding out from a standard tractor-trailer bed. It uses a lot of color, which makes the clinic look welcoming and provides visual clues for usage in a region where dozens of languages are spoken. The design also allows outdoor deck space to be customized for each location.

"The idea is they would fold down from the trailer, but then the community could come in to use their knowledge to build the sun shading and the railings," Patrick said. "So the local community would feel involved with it."

Patrick and Simon said they hope to stay connected to the project as it is built and put to use in Cambodia in a pilot project late this year.

"We definitely want to get to Cambodia and stay as involved as possible," Patrick said. "We'll get to test the ideas we had in the design and see how they work in the real world, and then be able to tweak it for future models. The idea is that this won't just be one clinic, but over time they will build more and more of them."

The Morgan brothers hope to do many more projects together, combining aspects of public health and innovative design.

"It's just really nice that the first time Simon and I worked together, doing something we plan on doing for a long time, that we were able to win," Patrick said. "It shows that our ideas meld together nicely."

Tom Eblen: (859) 231-1415. Email: teblen@herald-leader.com. Twitter: @tomeblen. Blog: tomeblen.bloginky.com

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