Tom Eblen: Logan's of Lexington celebrates 50 years with cross-generational appeal

Herald-Leader columnistMay 26, 2014 

Betty Logan and her sons Steve, left, and Elliott are marking Logan's of Lexington's 50th year. Logan's was founded as a variety store in Midway by Betty's husband, the late Harlan Logan, in 1964.

TOM EBLEN | STAFF — Herald-Leader Buy Photo

Harlan and Betty Logan grew up in Lewis County, married at 18 and decided to go into business for themselves. Their first venture was a nine-stool diner in downtown in Nicholasville, and the work was exhausting.

Still, they managed to save $10,000 in five years. "We worked so many hours we didn't have time to spend it," she said.

The couple used their earnings to buy a variety store in Midway in 1964. There, they had the opposite problem: few customers. "We were very fortunate to hang in there," she said.

In desperation, Harlan finally decided to refocus the store on fine clothing. It turned out to be a smart move. Logan's of Lexington menswear is celebrating its 50th year in business and, the family says, doing better than ever.

Harlan Logan died in December at age 74, but most of his family remains involved in the business to some degree. Sons Steve, 46, and Elliot, 43, run the place with help from Betty and her three sisters, Judy, Pearl and Molly.

Elliot's father-in-law, Wally Schmidt, works in the stock room. Elliot's wife, Carol, and Steve's wife, Misty, come in to help when needed.

"We have a very close family," Elliot said.

Salesman Darrell McCarty has been with Logan's for 22 years, and Jamie Burch has worked at the store for 14 years.

After Harlan decided to focus on high-end clothing in 1966, he traveled to New York City to get ideas for the store.

"He was always very progressive," Elliot said. "He had a sixth sense about when a line was going to be hot or when something was going to be in fashion."

The Midway store started attracting a regional clientele. "We had a lot of midnight sales," Betty recalled. "We would have the whole town of Midway packed with cars."

A Versailles warehouse store was added, then franchised stores in Georgetown and Nicholasville. Those closed in the late 1980s, and operations were moved and consolidated in Lexington's Tates Creek Center in 1992.

"This has been our best location," said Betty, but its small size prompted the family to drop women's clothes and focus on menswear.

The store's most memorable day came in January 2003. Just before Christmas, an elderly woman had come in looking for a shoehorn. Harlan gave her one, free of charge, adding that if her husband ever needed clothing she should bring him in. She did just that a few weeks later. By the time the couple finished shopping about 2:30 a.m., the cash register total was $35,600.

Small clothing stores have struggled in recent years. Men dress up less often for both work and pleasure, and independent retailers have been squeezed by big retail chains.

Lexington's oldest menswear store, Graves, Cox & Co., began a going-out-of-business sale last week as owner Leonard Cox prepares to retire. His grandfather co-founded the business in 1888. Cox said two Georgia investors plan to open a men's store in the same location, 325 West Main Street.

The Logan brothers said their business has stayed strong by diversifying and keeping up with trends. "We had a record year last year," Elliot said. "This year has been even better."

Although suits, sport coats and accessories are still the foundation of the business, high-end sportswear and "dress casual" clothing has become a growth area.

Steve has worked on marketing to University of Kentucky and Transylvania University students by using social media, attending fraternity events and recruiting a dozen students as campus representatives each semester.

"I've told those guys on campus, we were your dad's store for a long time, but we've got a lot of things for you now if you come and take a look," he said.

The store carries Southern Tide, a popular youth-oriented line of preppy clothing. Twice annual trunk shows pack the store with college men. "It's great to see the next generation walking through your door," Steve said.

Looking toward the future, Betty hopes some or all of her four granddaughters will be interested in keeping the business in the family. Steve has three daughters — Tori, Abby and Kailyn — and Elliot has one daughter, Taylor.

"Our days as a men's store may be numbered," Elliot said. "The future of Logan's is probably a ladies' shop."

Tom Eblen: (859) 231-1415. Email: teblen@herald-leader.com. Twitter: @tomeblen.Blog: tomeblen.bloginky.com.

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