Letters to editor: July 25

July 25, 2014 

Legislative terrorist

The basis of Sen. Mitch McConnell's career has been superb and ruthless political skills and his direction of federal dollars to the state. One would expect that a five-term senator would have authored several pieces of landmark legislation. This is not the case. His record is rather pedestrian; he is a government policy wonk and has offered few solutions.

He criticizes the legislation and proposals of the Democratic Party using false information. He is the "Great Obstructionist" with filibusters stopping what could be productive legislation. His role has become a legislative terrorist. His contributors and constituency are those who control the hard-working middle class and the poor.

His policy and political positions are being dictated by the extreme Republican right wing. When he does decide to become involved, as he did with raising the debt limit, it comes from desperation after the carnage has started.

Danny Shearer

Lexington

Justice served

Officer Jeff Brangers got his just desserts. It did my heart good to read in the July 15 newspaper, "Policeman who shot dog resigns."

Brangers should never be allowed to join any police force. He shot and killed a neighbor's 12-year old-dog as he was sitting watching his chickens. When the dog wandered off the property, he shot it.

Seems strange he had a gun while he was in his yard. Because of this cruel and thoughtless act, Brangers should seek help. He is a detriment to society.

Kathleen Fonagy

Lexington

Stricter driving laws

How are parents supposed to teach children the responsibilities of driving when there are many distractions? Driving has become secondary to eating, drinking, brushing your teeth, putting makeup on, talking with your hands, etc.

Who has time to watch the road with so much other stuff to do? One thing that drives me nuts is seeing people texting, dialing, or talking on their phones while turning a corner or parking using one hand — an accident waiting to happen.

The number of state and city government vehicle operators who I see talking on their phones is an issue. What kind of message is this sending? There should be a law that no state or city employee driving a vehicle owned by these agencies should be allowed to operate an electronic device while behind the wheel.

This same law should apply to any form of commercial vehicle. We must stop these types of unsafe acts before we can convince the younger generation of the major consequences of their actions. The old rule, "do as I say and not as I do," is really running thin.

Brent Webster

Nicholasville

Prostate therapy omitted

I read with great interest the July 12 column by Dr. Richard Matter. He does a good job of introducing basic information on the diagnosis of prostate cancer, but is remiss in neglecting to mention what may be the most efficacious method of treatment — proton beam radiation therapy.

When I was a high-risk patient, I chose proton beam therapy to treat my prostate cancer four years ago at Indiana University's Proton Health Center. There were only seven proton centers in the country.

Today, there are twice that number in operation with 12 more in development. Two of the new proton centers are being constructed in Minnesota and Arizona by the Mayo Clinic.

Prostate patients who have chosen this therapy are virtually unanimous in feeling we made the right choice from the treatment options available.

Avoiding serious side effects, maintaining one's quality of life and minimizing the possibility of recurrence should make proton beam therapy at least an option to be mentioned when listing the various forms of prostate cancer treatments.

Chet Sygiel

Jackson