Nikki Finney read from her collection "Head Off & Split," which recently won the National Book Award for poetry, at the Carnegie Center last Tuesday evening. Finney, a South Carolina native who wrote much of her book "Rice" in a study carrel at the Carnegie Center, said of Lexington:  "There is a community here hungry for good books."  Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com
Nikki Finney read from her collection "Head Off & Split," which recently won the National Book Award for poetry, at the Carnegie Center last Tuesday evening. Finney, a South Carolina native who wrote much of her book "Rice" in a study carrel at the Carnegie Center, said of Lexington: "There is a community here hungry for good books." Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com
Nikki Finney read from her collection "Head Off & Split," which recently won the National Book Award for poetry, at the Carnegie Center last Tuesday evening. Finney, a South Carolina native who wrote much of her book "Rice" in a study carrel at the Carnegie Center, said of Lexington: "There is a community here hungry for good books." Photo by Tom Eblen | teblen@herald-leader.com

Tom Eblen: Is Lexington the Literary Capital of Mid-America?

February 11, 2012 03:45 PM

UPDATED November 12, 2015 12:47 PM

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