James Still: The longtime Knott County resident was best known for the 1940 novel River of Earth, about coal mining in Eastern Kentucky. The Washington Post praised the book: "As you read you can hear the redbirds in the plum thickets and smell the pawpaws at first frost; you know, too, what it means to scrape the bottom of the meat box with a plow blade, hunting for a rind of pork amid the salt when the mines are closed."
James Still: The longtime Knott County resident was best known for the 1940 novel River of Earth, about coal mining in Eastern Kentucky. The Washington Post praised the book: "As you read you can hear the redbirds in the plum thickets and smell the pawpaws at first frost; you know, too, what it means to scrape the bottom of the meat box with a plow blade, hunting for a rind of pork amid the salt when the mines are closed." Lexington Herald-Leader
James Still: The longtime Knott County resident was best known for the 1940 novel River of Earth, about coal mining in Eastern Kentucky. The Washington Post praised the book: "As you read you can hear the redbirds in the plum thickets and smell the pawpaws at first frost; you know, too, what it means to scrape the bottom of the meat box with a plow blade, hunting for a rind of pork amid the salt when the mines are closed." Lexington Herald-Leader

Six inducted into Kentucky Writers Hall of Fame

January 25, 2013 10:34 AM

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