Thousands of migrating purple martins flew over the Hamburg Pavilion shopping center last week, looking for places to roost. More than 10,000 purple martins, mixed with about 5,000 European starlings, were staging at Hamburg as the sun set. The birds were preparing to leave on their winter migration to northern South America. The swallow family of birds are some of the first to migrate. These birds, which have attracted bird-watchers from around the region, will stay around for only a week or two, according to John Brunjes with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Such mass roosts occur in Kentucky every year, but they are normally in remote places and not visible to large human populations.
Thousands of migrating purple martins flew over the Hamburg Pavilion shopping center last week, looking for places to roost. More than 10,000 purple martins, mixed with about 5,000 European starlings, were staging at Hamburg as the sun set. The birds were preparing to leave on their winter migration to northern South America. The swallow family of birds are some of the first to migrate. These birds, which have attracted bird-watchers from around the region, will stay around for only a week or two, according to John Brunjes with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Such mass roosts occur in Kentucky every year, but they are normally in remote places and not visible to large human populations. Herald-Leader
Thousands of migrating purple martins flew over the Hamburg Pavilion shopping center last week, looking for places to roost. More than 10,000 purple martins, mixed with about 5,000 European starlings, were staging at Hamburg as the sun set. The birds were preparing to leave on their winter migration to northern South America. The swallow family of birds are some of the first to migrate. These birds, which have attracted bird-watchers from around the region, will stay around for only a week or two, according to John Brunjes with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Such mass roosts occur in Kentucky every year, but they are normally in remote places and not visible to large human populations. Herald-Leader

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August 18, 2014 11:07 AM

Photos, video: Purple martins' majesty

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