Raeford Brown
Raeford Brown Greer Photography Greer Photography
Raeford Brown Greer Photography Greer Photography

Knowing how to respond to a drug overdose could save a life

July 16, 2017 06:40 AM

UPDATED July 16, 2017 06:48 AM

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  • Majority of football players had CTE shows study of donated brains

    A recent study looked at the donated brains of former football players including professional, semi-professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Researchers found a change in the brains of former NFL players, known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE. CTE is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain. Researchers found that of the 202 brains studied, nearly 88 percent of them had CTE. The results were more pronounced among former NFL players.