FILE - This Dec. 29, 2011 file photo shows the entrance to the editorial offices of the New England Journal of Medicine in Boston. On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, the journal retracted and republished a landmark study on the Mediterranean diet, and issued an unprecedented five other corrections after an obscure report in 2017 scrutinized thousands of articles in eight journals over more than a decade and questioned some methods. The New England Journal's review did not alter any conclusions and should raise public trust in science, not erode it, said its top editor, Dr. Jeffrey Drazen.
FILE - This Dec. 29, 2011 file photo shows the entrance to the editorial offices of the New England Journal of Medicine in Boston. On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, the journal retracted and republished a landmark study on the Mediterranean diet, and issued an unprecedented five other corrections after an obscure report in 2017 scrutinized thousands of articles in eight journals over more than a decade and questioned some methods. The New England Journal's review did not alter any conclusions and should raise public trust in science, not erode it, said its top editor, Dr. Jeffrey Drazen. Michael Dwyer AP Photo
FILE - This Dec. 29, 2011 file photo shows the entrance to the editorial offices of the New England Journal of Medicine in Boston. On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, the journal retracted and republished a landmark study on the Mediterranean diet, and issued an unprecedented five other corrections after an obscure report in 2017 scrutinized thousands of articles in eight journals over more than a decade and questioned some methods. The New England Journal's review did not alter any conclusions and should raise public trust in science, not erode it, said its top editor, Dr. Jeffrey Drazen. Michael Dwyer AP Photo

Science Says: What happens when researchers make mistakes

June 13, 2018 05:52 PM