Dr. Todd Coté, left, led a meeting last month with part of the palliative care team at Central Baptist Hospital. Palliative care is devoted to  providing family-centered care to patients with life-limiting illnesses. Team members include, clockwise from Cote's left, nurse practitioner  Edmond Pendleton, social worker Shellie Hall, hospice representative Sandy Mathis, chaplain Lori Casey and nurse Laura Dicks.
Dr. Todd Coté, left, led a meeting last month with part of the palliative care team at Central Baptist Hospital. Palliative care is devoted to providing family-centered care to patients with life-limiting illnesses. Team members include, clockwise from Cote's left, nurse practitioner Edmond Pendleton, social worker Shellie Hall, hospice representative Sandy Mathis, chaplain Lori Casey and nurse Laura Dicks.
Dr. Todd Coté, left, led a meeting last month with part of the palliative care team at Central Baptist Hospital. Palliative care is devoted to providing family-centered care to patients with life-limiting illnesses. Team members include, clockwise from Cote's left, nurse practitioner Edmond Pendleton, social worker Shellie Hall, hospice representative Sandy Mathis, chaplain Lori Casey and nurse Laura Dicks.

Team approach offers care for progressive illnesses

December 24, 2011 12:00 AM

UPDATED December 24, 2011 03:53 AM

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