When it comes to breast cancer, "I want people to know you could still be a macho man and still have to watch for it," says Gregory Burchett of  Johnson County. He waited a few months to seek treatment after finding a lump. His doctor at Lexington's Markey Cancer Center has given Burchett a good prognosis.
When it comes to breast cancer, "I want people to know you could still be a macho man and still have to watch for it," says Gregory Burchett of Johnson County. He waited a few months to seek treatment after finding a lump. His doctor at Lexington's Markey Cancer Center has given Burchett a good prognosis. Herald-Leader
When it comes to breast cancer, "I want people to know you could still be a macho man and still have to watch for it," says Gregory Burchett of Johnson County. He waited a few months to seek treatment after finding a lump. His doctor at Lexington's Markey Cancer Center has given Burchett a good prognosis. Herald-Leader

Breast-cancer survivor encourages other men to see their doctors

August 20, 2012 10:08 AM

UPDATED August 21, 2012 07:48 AM

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