17-year-old Yesenia Torres laughed while covering her eyes before  receiving a flu shot from Elizabeth Pfeffer at Free Flu Friday, a  free one-day clinic sponsored by The Lexington-Fayette County  Health Department, held at department s Public Health North Campus,  805-A Newtown Circle in Lexington, Ky., Friday, October, 14, 2011.  They hoped to give 2,000 free flu shots today. Charles Bertram oe  Staff
17-year-old Yesenia Torres laughed while covering her eyes before receiving a flu shot from Elizabeth Pfeffer at Free Flu Friday, a free one-day clinic sponsored by The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, held at department s Public Health North Campus, 805-A Newtown Circle in Lexington, Ky., Friday, October, 14, 2011. They hoped to give 2,000 free flu shots today. Charles Bertram oe Staff
17-year-old Yesenia Torres laughed while covering her eyes before receiving a flu shot from Elizabeth Pfeffer at Free Flu Friday, a free one-day clinic sponsored by The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, held at department s Public Health North Campus, 805-A Newtown Circle in Lexington, Ky., Friday, October, 14, 2011. They hoped to give 2,000 free flu shots today. Charles Bertram oe Staff

Flu widespread in Kentucky, but health professionals are managing

January 11, 2013 04:29 PM

UPDATED March 27, 2013 12:26 PM

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