Above: Enrique Smith-Forbes, an occupational therapist and graduate student in rehabilitation sciences, used a dollar bill to join two paperclips and make them leap in the air during a continuing education course by Kevin Spencer, right, a traveling illusionist. Left: Marilyn Campbell, a graduate student, used a trick to make a knot in her rope.
Above: Enrique Smith-Forbes, an occupational therapist and graduate student in rehabilitation sciences, used a dollar bill to join two paperclips and make them leap in the air during a continuing education course by Kevin Spencer, right, a traveling illusionist. Left: Marilyn Campbell, a graduate student, used a trick to make a knot in her rope. Lexington Herald-Leader
Above: Enrique Smith-Forbes, an occupational therapist and graduate student in rehabilitation sciences, used a dollar bill to join two paperclips and make them leap in the air during a continuing education course by Kevin Spencer, right, a traveling illusionist. Left: Marilyn Campbell, a graduate student, used a trick to make a knot in her rope. Lexington Herald-Leader

Performer teaches therapeutic magic to doctors, therapists

February 26, 2013 12:00 AM

UPDATED February 26, 2013 08:50 AM

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