Mike Simms of Jamestown, a survivor of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, wore a mask outside The James Cancer Center at Ohio State University four weeks after he received a blood cell transplant in 2010. It was his first trip outside since the transplant, and he wore a mask because his immune system was still weakened. The transplant cured his cancer and saved his life. On Thursday he will go to Washington, D.C., to talk to politicians about funding for the registry that helped him find his donor.
Mike Simms of Jamestown, a survivor of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, wore a mask outside The James Cancer Center at Ohio State University four weeks after he received a blood cell transplant in 2010. It was his first trip outside since the transplant, and he wore a mask because his immune system was still weakened. The transplant cured his cancer and saved his life. On Thursday he will go to Washington, D.C., to talk to politicians about funding for the registry that helped him find his donor. Photo provided
Mike Simms of Jamestown, a survivor of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, wore a mask outside The James Cancer Center at Ohio State University four weeks after he received a blood cell transplant in 2010. It was his first trip outside since the transplant, and he wore a mask because his immune system was still weakened. The transplant cured his cancer and saved his life. On Thursday he will go to Washington, D.C., to talk to politicians about funding for the registry that helped him find his donor. Photo provided

Health & Medicine

July 17, 2013 7:23 PM

Kentucky couple to advocate for cancer-support group's federal funding

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