Cellist Lisa Svejkovsky-Schaeffer was involved in a bicycling accident with a tractor trailer in November 2013 that resulted in the loss of her right leg. She has since returned to performing with the Philharmonic but still faces large bills for prosthetics and other care. She was photographed at a rehearsal for the Philharmonic's New Year's Eve concert on Dec. 29, 2014, at the Lexington Opera House. Photo by Rich Copley | Herald-Leader staff.
Cellist Lisa Svejkovsky-Schaeffer was involved in a bicycling accident with a tractor trailer in November 2013 that resulted in the loss of her right leg. She has since returned to performing with the Philharmonic but still faces large bills for prosthetics and other care. She was photographed at a rehearsal for the Philharmonic's New Year's Eve concert on Dec. 29, 2014, at the Lexington Opera House. Photo by Rich Copley | Herald-Leader staff. Staff
Cellist Lisa Svejkovsky-Schaeffer was involved in a bicycling accident with a tractor trailer in November 2013 that resulted in the loss of her right leg. She has since returned to performing with the Philharmonic but still faces large bills for prosthetics and other care. She was photographed at a rehearsal for the Philharmonic's New Year's Eve concert on Dec. 29, 2014, at the Lexington Opera House. Photo by Rich Copley | Herald-Leader staff. Staff

Second movement: Lexington Philharmonic cellist adjusts to 'new normal' after bicycle accident resulted in leg amputation

January 03, 2015 07:10 PM

UPDATED October 06, 2015 01:54 PM

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