In this Thursday, June 19, 2014 photo, technical assistant Eliska Didyk wears protective gloves while displaying a bottle containing human fecal solution, frozen to minus 80 degrees celsius, in an OpenBiome laboratory, in Medford, Mass. With many patients no longer responding to potent antibiotics, stool has emerged as a surprisingly effective treatment for hard-to-treat gut infections.
In this Thursday, June 19, 2014 photo, technical assistant Eliska Didyk wears protective gloves while displaying a bottle containing human fecal solution, frozen to minus 80 degrees celsius, in an OpenBiome laboratory, in Medford, Mass. With many patients no longer responding to potent antibiotics, stool has emerged as a surprisingly effective treatment for hard-to-treat gut infections. Steven Senne AP Photo
In this Thursday, June 19, 2014 photo, technical assistant Eliska Didyk wears protective gloves while displaying a bottle containing human fecal solution, frozen to minus 80 degrees celsius, in an OpenBiome laboratory, in Medford, Mass. With many patients no longer responding to potent antibiotics, stool has emerged as a surprisingly effective treatment for hard-to-treat gut infections. Steven Senne AP Photo

Frozen fecal matter as good as fresh for transplanting

January 13, 2016 7:58 AM

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