In this Nov. 2, 2017 photo provided by Recirculating Farms Coalition, red lettuce grows at an aquaponic farm, a form of hydroponic cultivation, in Hilliard, Fla. The National Organic Standards Board, which advises the U.S. Department of Agriculture, voted in early November 2017 to allow produce raised hydroponically without soil to be certified as organic. Following the vote, some traditional organic farmers say they are working on an alternative to the USDA certification.
In this Nov. 2, 2017 photo provided by Recirculating Farms Coalition, red lettuce grows at an aquaponic farm, a form of hydroponic cultivation, in Hilliard, Fla. The National Organic Standards Board, which advises the U.S. Department of Agriculture, voted in early November 2017 to allow produce raised hydroponically without soil to be certified as organic. Following the vote, some traditional organic farmers say they are working on an alternative to the USDA certification. Recirculating Farms Coalition via AP)
In this Nov. 2, 2017 photo provided by Recirculating Farms Coalition, red lettuce grows at an aquaponic farm, a form of hydroponic cultivation, in Hilliard, Fla. The National Organic Standards Board, which advises the U.S. Department of Agriculture, voted in early November 2017 to allow produce raised hydroponically without soil to be certified as organic. Following the vote, some traditional organic farmers say they are working on an alternative to the USDA certification. Recirculating Farms Coalition via AP)

Organic-food purists assail the designation for hydroponics

November 15, 2017 09:42 AM

UPDATED November 15, 2017 09:43 AM

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