At left, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers Rich Waite, front, and Bryan Bowling, back, helped guide a rescue boat through a street in New Orleans in September 2005, a few days after Hurricane Katrina struck. ABC Nightline anchor Ted Koppel, in the middle at right, also helped guide push the Kentucky boat carrying Rose Lee Branch, 72, to a medical evacuation helicopter at the Fair Grounds Race Course. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers had convinced Branch and her husband, Clarence Branch Jr., and daughter Viola Hill to finally leave their flooded house. The water became too shallow, so everybody, included Koppel, who had been interviewing her, had to jump out and push the boat the final 50 yards to the waiting U.S. Army helicopter. For Waite, Bowling and other Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers who went to New Orleans to help out, the memories of the experience remain vivid even after 10 years.
At left, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers Rich Waite, front, and Bryan Bowling, back, helped guide a rescue boat through a street in New Orleans in September 2005, a few days after Hurricane Katrina struck. ABC Nightline anchor Ted Koppel, in the middle at right, also helped guide push the Kentucky boat carrying Rose Lee Branch, 72, to a medical evacuation helicopter at the Fair Grounds Race Course. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers had convinced Branch and her husband, Clarence Branch Jr., and daughter Viola Hill to finally leave their flooded house. The water became too shallow, so everybody, included Koppel, who had been interviewing her, had to jump out and push the boat the final 50 yards to the waiting U.S. Army helicopter. For Waite, Bowling and other Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers who went to New Orleans to help out, the memories of the experience remain vivid even after 10 years. LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER
At left, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers Rich Waite, front, and Bryan Bowling, back, helped guide a rescue boat through a street in New Orleans in September 2005, a few days after Hurricane Katrina struck. ABC Nightline anchor Ted Koppel, in the middle at right, also helped guide push the Kentucky boat carrying Rose Lee Branch, 72, to a medical evacuation helicopter at the Fair Grounds Race Course. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers had convinced Branch and her husband, Clarence Branch Jr., and daughter Viola Hill to finally leave their flooded house. The water became too shallow, so everybody, included Koppel, who had been interviewing her, had to jump out and push the boat the final 50 yards to the waiting U.S. Army helicopter. For Waite, Bowling and other Kentucky Fish and Wildlife officers who went to New Orleans to help out, the memories of the experience remain vivid even after 10 years. LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER

10 years after Katrina, Kentuckians remember the victims they helped, and the ones they couldn't

August 22, 2015 6:38 PM

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