Rocky Sebastian, left, owner of Sebastian Sign and Crane Co., and Casey McCracken and Tommy Verdin, both with the Verdin Co., worked on the dial as they reinstalled the Skuller's clock Tuesday in the 100 block of West Main Street in downtown Lexington. The cast-iron clock, which is about 14 feet tall, was taken down in 2010 and stored until money was raised for the complete restoration by the Verdin Co. of Cincinnati. Skuller's used to sell eyeglasses in addition to jewelry, and the restored clock will include a set of eyes similar to the eyes on the original clock. The new workings include an atomic clock with a 10-year backup battery to assure accurate time.
Rocky Sebastian, left, owner of Sebastian Sign and Crane Co., and Casey McCracken and Tommy Verdin, both with the Verdin Co., worked on the dial as they reinstalled the Skuller's clock Tuesday in the 100 block of West Main Street in downtown Lexington. The cast-iron clock, which is about 14 feet tall, was taken down in 2010 and stored until money was raised for the complete restoration by the Verdin Co. of Cincinnati. Skuller's used to sell eyeglasses in addition to jewelry, and the restored clock will include a set of eyes similar to the eyes on the original clock. The new workings include an atomic clock with a 10-year backup battery to assure accurate time. Herald-Leader
Rocky Sebastian, left, owner of Sebastian Sign and Crane Co., and Casey McCracken and Tommy Verdin, both with the Verdin Co., worked on the dial as they reinstalled the Skuller's clock Tuesday in the 100 block of West Main Street in downtown Lexington. The cast-iron clock, which is about 14 feet tall, was taken down in 2010 and stored until money was raised for the complete restoration by the Verdin Co. of Cincinnati. Skuller's used to sell eyeglasses in addition to jewelry, and the restored clock will include a set of eyes similar to the eyes on the original clock. The new workings include an atomic clock with a 10-year backup battery to assure accurate time. Herald-Leader

Restored Skuller's clock returned to place of prominence in Lexington

September 17, 2013 02:00 PM

UPDATED September 17, 2013 09:44 PM

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