Jim "The Colonel" Mattingly pitched for the Norwood Highlanders in a game of vintage baseball, played like those in the 1860s. The teams competed on the grounds of Waveland State Historic Site in Lexington. The Highlanders beat the Losantiville Black Stockings 16-4. Players dressed in old-time uniforms, with equipment made to standards of the period. They also used the rules, customs and terminology of the earliest days of base ball, which was spelled as two words back then. The Highlanders and Black Stockings are based in Cincinnati. They play against each other and other vintage teams in a season that extends into October. Photo by Mark Mahan
Jim "The Colonel" Mattingly pitched for the Norwood Highlanders in a game of vintage baseball, played like those in the 1860s. The teams competed on the grounds of Waveland State Historic Site in Lexington. The Highlanders beat the Losantiville Black Stockings 16-4. Players dressed in old-time uniforms, with equipment made to standards of the period. They also used the rules, customs and terminology of the earliest days of base ball, which was spelled as two words back then. The Highlanders and Black Stockings are based in Cincinnati. They play against each other and other vintage teams in a season that extends into October. Photo by Mark Mahan Herald-Leader
Jim "The Colonel" Mattingly pitched for the Norwood Highlanders in a game of vintage baseball, played like those in the 1860s. The teams competed on the grounds of Waveland State Historic Site in Lexington. The Highlanders beat the Losantiville Black Stockings 16-4. Players dressed in old-time uniforms, with equipment made to standards of the period. They also used the rules, customs and terminology of the earliest days of base ball, which was spelled as two words back then. The Highlanders and Black Stockings are based in Cincinnati. They play against each other and other vintage teams in a season that extends into October. Photo by Mark Mahan Herald-Leader

A vintage snapshot of an American pastime

May 17, 2015 08:15 PM

UPDATED May 18, 2015 12:04 AM

More Videos

  • Local hip hop artist performing 24 hours to collect coats for kids

    Devine Carama, Local hip hop artist and Believing in Forever Nonprofit director, is performing for 24 hours at Courthouse Plaza to raise awareness and money for the 4th annual Coat to Keep The Cold Away youth coat drive, which collects new and unused coats for children in central and eastern Kentucky areas.