Richmond police officer Chip Gray, left, worked with Lexington police Sgt. Eric Bowling as they continued Reno's training on suspect apprehension. Reno, a German shepherd, is 3. Most of the unit's dogs retire by about age 8. Retirement generally means going to live with their handlers.
Richmond police officer Chip Gray, left, worked with Lexington police Sgt. Eric Bowling as they continued Reno's training on suspect apprehension. Reno, a German shepherd, is 3. Most of the unit's dogs retire by about age 8. Retirement generally means going to live with their handlers. Herald-Leader
Richmond police officer Chip Gray, left, worked with Lexington police Sgt. Eric Bowling as they continued Reno's training on suspect apprehension. Reno, a German shepherd, is 3. Most of the unit's dogs retire by about age 8. Retirement generally means going to live with their handlers. Herald-Leader

Trained police dogs serve vital roles in searches, apprehensions

August 21, 2012 12:00 AM

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