An ancient scroll, completely covered in blazing-hot volcanic material, is displayed at the Naples' National Library, Italy, Jan. 20, 2015. Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world's oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets. The scroll is among hundreds retrieved from the remains of a lavish villa at Herculaneum, which along with Pompeii was one of several Roman towns that were destroyed when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta)
An ancient scroll, completely covered in blazing-hot volcanic material, is displayed at the Naples' National Library, Italy, Jan. 20, 2015. Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world's oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets. The scroll is among hundreds retrieved from the remains of a lavish villa at Herculaneum, which along with Pompeii was one of several Roman towns that were destroyed when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta) AP
An ancient scroll, completely covered in blazing-hot volcanic material, is displayed at the Naples' National Library, Italy, Jan. 20, 2015. Scientists have succeeded in reading parts of an ancient scroll that was buried in a volcanic eruption almost 2,000 years ago, holding out the promise that the world's oldest surviving library may one day reveal all of its secrets. The scroll is among hundreds retrieved from the remains of a lavish villa at Herculaneum, which along with Pompeii was one of several Roman towns that were destroyed when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta) AP

Breakthrough allows University of Kentucky software team to capture writing on ancient scrolls

January 20, 2015 05:54 PM

UPDATED November 12, 2015 11:24 PM

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