Business partners Henry Tandy and Albert Byrd, two black bricklayers in Lexington during the late 1800s and early 1900s, did the brick work on many notable local buildings. One of Tandy & Byrd's biggest jobs was the Fayette County Courthouse.
Business partners Henry Tandy and Albert Byrd, two black bricklayers in Lexington during the late 1800s and early 1900s, did the brick work on many notable local buildings. One of Tandy & Byrd's biggest jobs was the Fayette County Courthouse. Herald-Leader
Business partners Henry Tandy and Albert Byrd, two black bricklayers in Lexington during the late 1800s and early 1900s, did the brick work on many notable local buildings. One of Tandy & Byrd's biggest jobs was the Fayette County Courthouse. Herald-Leader

Tom Eblen: Freed slave left his mark all over Lexington, and you can still see it today

February 15, 2014 7:40 PM

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About Tom Eblen

Tom Eblen

@tomeblen

Tom Eblen is a columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader who writes about life, people and issues in Lexington and Kentucky. A Lexington native, Eblen was the Herald-Leader's managing editor from 1998 to 2008.