Tressa Brown, left, of the Kentucky Heritage Council, showed the last remaining building from the Choctaw Academy to Francine Locke-Bray of Antlers, Okla., whose great-great-grandfather, Thomson McKenney, attended the Scott County school in the 1830s. The building was probably a dormitory. The academy was created in 1819 to educate boys from Indian tribes throughout the eastern United States.
Tressa Brown, left, of the Kentucky Heritage Council, showed the last remaining building from the Choctaw Academy to Francine Locke-Bray of Antlers, Okla., whose great-great-grandfather, Thomson McKenney, attended the Scott County school in the 1830s. The building was probably a dormitory. The academy was created in 1819 to educate boys from Indian tribes throughout the eastern United States. Tom Eblen teblen@herald-leader.com
Tressa Brown, left, of the Kentucky Heritage Council, showed the last remaining building from the Choctaw Academy to Francine Locke-Bray of Antlers, Okla., whose great-great-grandfather, Thomson McKenney, attended the Scott County school in the 1830s. The building was probably a dormitory. The academy was created in 1819 to educate boys from Indian tribes throughout the eastern United States. Tom Eblen teblen@herald-leader.com

Preservationists rush to save long-forgotten Native American school

April 15, 2016 11:52 AM

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About Tom Eblen

Tom Eblen

@tomeblen

Tom Eblen is a columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader who writes about life, people and issues in Lexington and Kentucky. A Lexington native, Eblen was the Herald-Leader's managing editor from 1998 to 2008.