The building at 340 E. Third St. that has been Smith & Smith funeral home since 1954 was built in 1866 by Winn Gunn, a white man who sold lots behind it to newly freed slaves. The house was later bought by Ellen Davis, a formerly enslaved woman. Her former white master, John T. Hughes, had fathered her child and left her much of his estate when he died in 1924. It is part of a new historic neighborhood map project that will be discussed at 4 p.m. June 26 at the Lyric Theatre.
The building at 340 E. Third St. that has been Smith & Smith funeral home since 1954 was built in 1866 by Winn Gunn, a white man who sold lots behind it to newly freed slaves. The house was later bought by Ellen Davis, a formerly enslaved woman. Her former white master, John T. Hughes, had fathered her child and left her much of his estate when he died in 1924. It is part of a new historic neighborhood map project that will be discussed at 4 p.m. June 26 at the Lyric Theatre. Tom Eblen teblen@herald-leader.com
The building at 340 E. Third St. that has been Smith & Smith funeral home since 1954 was built in 1866 by Winn Gunn, a white man who sold lots behind it to newly freed slaves. The house was later bought by Ellen Davis, a formerly enslaved woman. Her former white master, John T. Hughes, had fathered her child and left her much of his estate when he died in 1924. It is part of a new historic neighborhood map project that will be discussed at 4 p.m. June 26 at the Lyric Theatre. Tom Eblen teblen@herald-leader.com

Tom Eblen

Lexington’s East End, Gardenside areas celebrate histories Sunday

June 21, 2016 4:28 PM

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About Tom Eblen

Tom Eblen

@tomeblen

Tom Eblen is a columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader who writes about life, people and issues in Lexington and Kentucky. A Lexington native, Eblen was the Herald-Leader's managing editor from 1998 to 2008.