FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, file photo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a news briefing at the White House in Washington. During a CNBC interview, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, Mnuchin avoided a direct answer when asked whether he supported the decision made by the Obama administration to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with Harriet Tubman, the 19th century African-American abolitionist who was a leader in the Underground Railroad. Mnuchin's response raised speculation that Tubman’s future on the $20 bill could be in jeopardy.
FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, file photo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a news briefing at the White House in Washington. During a CNBC interview, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, Mnuchin avoided a direct answer when asked whether he supported the decision made by the Obama administration to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with Harriet Tubman, the 19th century African-American abolitionist who was a leader in the Underground Railroad. Mnuchin's response raised speculation that Tubman’s future on the $20 bill could be in jeopardy. Carolyn Kaster AP
FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, file photo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks during a news briefing at the White House in Washington. During a CNBC interview, Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, Mnuchin avoided a direct answer when asked whether he supported the decision made by the Obama administration to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with Harriet Tubman, the 19th century African-American abolitionist who was a leader in the Underground Railroad. Mnuchin's response raised speculation that Tubman’s future on the $20 bill could be in jeopardy. Carolyn Kaster AP

Treasury inspector general to review Mnuchin’s controversial flight to Fort Knox

September 01, 2017 11:17 PM

More Videos

  • Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger?

    Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why.