Natalia Truszczynski, left, and K.T. White, middle,  kissed after being married by Fayette Circuit Judge Kathy Stein in her chambers in Judge Stein's chambers in Lexington, Ky., Friday, June 26, 2015. A divided Supreme Court made history today ruling that the Constitution ensures the right of same-sex couples to marry. Following the ruling, several couples showed up at the Fayette County Clerk's Office to obtain marriage licenses. At least two then got married at the Fayette County Circuit Courthouse and then returned to the Clerk's Office for the final paperwork.  Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff
Natalia Truszczynski, left, and K.T. White, middle, kissed after being married by Fayette Circuit Judge Kathy Stein in her chambers in Judge Stein's chambers in Lexington, Ky., Friday, June 26, 2015. A divided Supreme Court made history today ruling that the Constitution ensures the right of same-sex couples to marry. Following the ruling, several couples showed up at the Fayette County Clerk's Office to obtain marriage licenses. At least two then got married at the Fayette County Circuit Courthouse and then returned to the Clerk's Office for the final paperwork. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff Herald-Leader
Natalia Truszczynski, left, and K.T. White, middle, kissed after being married by Fayette Circuit Judge Kathy Stein in her chambers in Judge Stein's chambers in Lexington, Ky., Friday, June 26, 2015. A divided Supreme Court made history today ruling that the Constitution ensures the right of same-sex couples to marry. Following the ruling, several couples showed up at the Fayette County Clerk's Office to obtain marriage licenses. At least two then got married at the Fayette County Circuit Courthouse and then returned to the Clerk's Office for the final paperwork. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff Herald-Leader

Several Kentucky county clerks defy same-sex marriage ruling, refuse to issue marriage licenses

June 29, 2015 12:31 PM

UPDATED November 12, 2015 11:35 PM

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