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'It didn't happen.' Watch Kentucky girl's tearful reaction to eclipse.

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Gov. Matt Bevin welcomes visitors 'from all over the world' in Eclipseville, Ky.

Timelapse: 2017 total solar eclipse in Kentucky 0:23

Timelapse: 2017 total solar eclipse in Kentucky

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The crowd goes wild as the sky goes dark

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Bam Adebayo and Malik Monk interact with kids at UK basketball camp

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  • How to safely watch a solar eclipse

    Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses.

Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses. NASA Goddard YouTube
Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses. NASA Goddard YouTube

NASA says your eclipse glasses may be unsafe. Here’s how to tell if they’re not

July 29, 2017 11:19 AM