Advocates of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” have contended that the quantity of natural gas locked into dense rock deep beneath Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and Ohio is large enough to supply the entire East Coast for 50 years. But freeing it requires a fracking’s powerful drilling process, which uses millions of gallons of water brewed with toxic chemicals that some fear threaten to pollute water supplies, deplete aquifers and perhaps endanger human health and the environment. Above, workers moved a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in 2010.
Advocates of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” have contended that the quantity of natural gas locked into dense rock deep beneath Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and Ohio is large enough to supply the entire East Coast for 50 years. But freeing it requires a fracking’s powerful drilling process, which uses millions of gallons of water brewed with toxic chemicals that some fear threaten to pollute water supplies, deplete aquifers and perhaps endanger human health and the environment. Above, workers moved a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in 2010. Ralph Wilson AP file photo
Advocates of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” have contended that the quantity of natural gas locked into dense rock deep beneath Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and Ohio is large enough to supply the entire East Coast for 50 years. But freeing it requires a fracking’s powerful drilling process, which uses millions of gallons of water brewed with toxic chemicals that some fear threaten to pollute water supplies, deplete aquifers and perhaps endanger human health and the environment. Above, workers moved a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in 2010. Ralph Wilson AP file photo

No peace of mind: Estill group fights to remove tons of radioactive waste

February 12, 2018 04:48 PM