From left: Marshall County High School students Hailey Case, Jordan Harrell and Lily Dunn, who have been active in calling for gun restrictions since the shooting that killed two students at their school, at Harrell's home in Calvert City on May 12. In rural, conservative parts of the country where farm fields crackle with target practice and children grow up turkey hunting with their parents, the new wave of student activism clashes with bedrock support for gun rights.
From left: Marshall County High School students Hailey Case, Jordan Harrell and Lily Dunn, who have been active in calling for gun restrictions since the shooting that killed two students at their school, at Harrell's home in Calvert City on May 12. In rural, conservative parts of the country where farm fields crackle with target practice and children grow up turkey hunting with their parents, the new wave of student activism clashes with bedrock support for gun rights. ANDREA MORALES NYT
From left: Marshall County High School students Hailey Case, Jordan Harrell and Lily Dunn, who have been active in calling for gun restrictions since the shooting that killed two students at their school, at Harrell's home in Calvert City on May 12. In rural, conservative parts of the country where farm fields crackle with target practice and children grow up turkey hunting with their parents, the new wave of student activism clashes with bedrock support for gun rights. ANDREA MORALES NYT

‘Almost no one agrees with us’: When Kentucky students fight gun violence.

May 22, 2018 03:01 PM