This Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 photo shows Kentucky State Penitentiary death row inmate Robert Foley, 55, at the Eddyville, Ky. State Penitentiary. Kentucky's death row is aging and it's costing the state. The 35 condemned inmates have an average age of 50, which is 14 years older than inmates not condemned to death. While the state doesn't keep separate statistics for the death row population, medical expenses for the Department of Corrections rose each year since 2008, from $49.1 million that year to $54.8 million in fiscal year 2011. (AP Photo/Daniel R. Patmore)
This Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 photo shows Kentucky State Penitentiary death row inmate Robert Foley, 55, at the Eddyville, Ky. State Penitentiary. Kentucky's death row is aging and it's costing the state. The 35 condemned inmates have an average age of 50, which is 14 years older than inmates not condemned to death. While the state doesn't keep separate statistics for the death row population, medical expenses for the Department of Corrections rose each year since 2008, from $49.1 million that year to $54.8 million in fiscal year 2011. (AP Photo/Daniel R. Patmore) Daniel Patmore Associated Press
This Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 photo shows Kentucky State Penitentiary death row inmate Robert Foley, 55, at the Eddyville, Ky. State Penitentiary. Kentucky's death row is aging and it's costing the state. The 35 condemned inmates have an average age of 50, which is 14 years older than inmates not condemned to death. While the state doesn't keep separate statistics for the death row population, medical expenses for the Department of Corrections rose each year since 2008, from $49.1 million that year to $54.8 million in fiscal year 2011. (AP Photo/Daniel R. Patmore) Daniel Patmore Associated Press

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