The city power board in Benham is working with several non-profit organizations on a plan to improve the energy efficiency of scores of homes in the historic coal town in Harlan County, which International Harvester began building in 1909. Many of the homes were not well-insulated when they were built. This photo shows the center of town. The taller building at left, built in 1923, was the coal-company commissary, where miners could buy a wide range of household and other goods. It now houses the Kentucky Coal Mining Museum. The other building housed a meat market and ice house.
The city power board in Benham is working with several non-profit organizations on a plan to improve the energy efficiency of scores of homes in the historic coal town in Harlan County, which International Harvester began building in 1909. Many of the homes were not well-insulated when they were built. This photo shows the center of town. The taller building at left, built in 1923, was the coal-company commissary, where miners could buy a wide range of household and other goods. It now houses the Kentucky Coal Mining Museum. The other building housed a meat market and ice house. Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com
The city power board in Benham is working with several non-profit organizations on a plan to improve the energy efficiency of scores of homes in the historic coal town in Harlan County, which International Harvester began building in 1909. Many of the homes were not well-insulated when they were built. This photo shows the center of town. The taller building at left, built in 1923, was the coal-company commissary, where miners could buy a wide range of household and other goods. It now houses the Kentucky Coal Mining Museum. The other building housed a meat market and ice house. Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com

Historic Harlan County coal town has ambitious plan to make homes more energy efficient

December 29, 2015 2:23 PM

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