The Mill Springs Battlefield Association operates a visitor center and museum with displays about the January 1862 Civil War battle in Pulaski and Wayne counties. The center is adjacent to Mill Springs National Cemetery, which the federal government established in 1867 near the battlefield. Union soldiers killed in the battle are buried there. Here, a marker with information about the battle looks over uniform rows of grave markers at the cemetery.
The Mill Springs Battlefield Association operates a visitor center and museum with displays about the January 1862 Civil War battle in Pulaski and Wayne counties. The center is adjacent to Mill Springs National Cemetery, which the federal government established in 1867 near the battlefield. Union soldiers killed in the battle are buried there. Here, a marker with information about the battle looks over uniform rows of grave markers at the cemetery. Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com
The Mill Springs Battlefield Association operates a visitor center and museum with displays about the January 1862 Civil War battle in Pulaski and Wayne counties. The center is adjacent to Mill Springs National Cemetery, which the federal government established in 1867 near the battlefield. Union soldiers killed in the battle are buried there. Here, a marker with information about the battle looks over uniform rows of grave markers at the cemetery. Bill Estep bestep@herald-leader.com

Study under way on adding Civil War battlefield in Pulaski, Wayne counties to national park system

December 31, 2015 3:33 PM

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