Asti Gallina, left, a law student from the University of Washington, volunteered in February to assist travelers going through customs. The Supreme Court said last month that President Donald Trump’s travel ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” Justices will hear full arguments in October.
Asti Gallina, left, a law student from the University of Washington, volunteered in February to assist travelers going through customs. The Supreme Court said last month that President Donald Trump’s travel ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” Justices will hear full arguments in October. Ted S. Warren Associated Press
Asti Gallina, left, a law student from the University of Washington, volunteered in February to assist travelers going through customs. The Supreme Court said last month that President Donald Trump’s travel ban on visitors from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen can be enforced if those visitors lack a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” Justices will hear full arguments in October. Ted S. Warren Associated Press

Supreme Court legislating from the bench on Trump travel ban

July 05, 2017 6:28 PM