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Ashley Judd makes Facebook Live debut to denounce ‘everyday sexism’ incident

Ashley Judd, right, a cast member in the EPIX series “Berlin Station,” answers a question as showrunner/executive producer Bradford Winters looks on during the 2017 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton on Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Ashley Judd, right, a cast member in the EPIX series “Berlin Station,” answers a question as showrunner/executive producer Bradford Winters looks on during the 2017 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton on Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Invision/AP

Ashley Judd used her first and second ever Facebook Live posts to take a stand against what she referred to as “Everyday sexism.”

The actress and activist with strong Kentucky ties was broadcasting from what she called, “one of the busiest and largest airports in the world” Saturday, recounting an incident with an airport employee.

“I was coming through security, and a guy said, ‘Hey sweetheart,’” Judd said in the video. “And I said, ‘I’m not your sweetheart, I am your client,’ so I was already setting a boundary.”

Judd went on to recount the worker – it was not clear in the video who exactly the man worked for or what his job was – saying “Nice dress” and touching her, while she was interacting with another airport employee.

“By the time, my skin is burning, my feet are burning – it’s so hard to continue to set these boundaries when someone continues to push,” Judd said, adding that she had spoken to a manager at the airport.

Posted by Ashley Judd on Saturday, August 5, 2017

In a follow-up post, also from the airport, a beaming Judd recounted her interaction with the manager, who she said apologized, spoke to the employee and gave her two three-pound vouchers for coffee – maybe we can narrow down the airport with that info.

“I think it’s really important if we’re discussing a problem also to highlight a solution,” Judd said. She also paraphrased a comment she attributed to the manager: “Just because 99 percent of the people don’t speak up, doesn’t mean it’s OK, and the one person who does speak up is the one who can help employees realize that it is inappropriate to use that kind of language in the work place.” Reactions in the video’s comments ranged from supportive to abusive.

The first video had more than 1.8 million views, and the second video, which Judd also put in the comments section of the first video, had more than 430,000 views as of Thursday evening. The incident has been covered by national news outlets including NBC’s “Today,” Fox News and a number of European outlets.

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