Restaurant News & Reviews

With Thanksgiving approaching, Elmwood Stock Farm talks turkey

LexGo Eat at Crank & Boom

We sampled the new fall ice cream menu at Crank & Boom Ice Cream Lounge, which also has new candy treats and specials planned for Halloween. Plus, we preview the final Food Truck Friday of the year at the Herald-Leader, welcome back Charlie's Seaf
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We sampled the new fall ice cream menu at Crank & Boom Ice Cream Lounge, which also has new candy treats and specials planned for Halloween. Plus, we preview the final Food Truck Friday of the year at the Herald-Leader, welcome back Charlie's Seaf

Ready to talk turkey? On Oct. 18 Elmwood Stock Farm on Paris Road in Georgetown will host chef John Foster of The Sage Rabbit, 438 South Ashland Avenue, for a special dinner and farm tour. The tour will focus on the farm’s organic heritage turkeys, which can be reserved for Thanksgiving. Elmwood also has standard organic turkeys available.

The dinner will feature Elmwood’s fresh organic foods. The tour begins promptly at 6 p.m., with dinner to follow. Tickets are $30 for children under 12 and $50 for adults, with a discount for Elmwood CSA members. Seating is limited; reserve a spot online at Elmwoodstockfarm.com. For more information, call 859-621-0755.

▪  Wild Thyme Cooking, 1060 Chinoe Road, is celebrating five years in business with a special dinner Oct. 22 at Grimes Mill Winery, 6707 Grimes Mill Road. The dinner will feature a fall Italian feast with wine pairings. From 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., enjoy guided tours and select barrel tastings from with signature appetizers. That will be followed by a three-course dinner overlooking the vineyard at sunset with live music. Tickets are $65, and seating is limited; reservations are available online at Wildthymecooking.com.

The menu will feature golden and red beet salad with dressed arugula, gorgonzola and candied pecans, in a Grimes Mill Moscato vinaigrette paired with a Ca’ Desimone Sauvignon blanc artisanal wine; herb-roasted Cornish game hens stuffed with rosemary and sage sausage stuffing served on a bed of wild rice and lentil pilaf; Brussels sprouts and root vegetable medley, topped with a fig onion port balsamic reduction and paired with Ca’ Desimone 2014 Brunello; and apple cinnamon walnut baklava with bourbon caramel sauce paired with bourbon-barrel aged Ca’ Desimone 2014 Sangiovese.

▪  Cooper Brothers Meats, 4379 Old Harrodsburg Road, has closed after less than two years in business. The specialty meats store posted a notice on Facebook on Aug. 31 thanking customers and urging them to continue to support local farmers and producers. Orders for Akaushi, Beeman, Wagyu and Kentucky beef, and Amish chickens and turkeys for Thanksgiving can be placed through chef and former manager Dina Johnson at chefdmj97@gmail.com. “We tried to provide the highest quality and the customer service,” Johnson said. “Butchering is a dying art.” Johnson is working with the distributors to start MediumRareMeats.com (the site is not active yet), a specialty meat concierge business, to deliver meat directly to customers.

▪  The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is looking for nine good chefs to help Kentucky schools upgrade their food offerings for their students and use more local foods. “The Chefs in Schools program was tremendously successful last year,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “This program benefits Kentucky students as well as Kentucky farmers and food businesses.”

Each chef will be assigned to a region of the state and help school employees estimate food consumption and requisition of food purchases; develop recipes with USDA guidelines in mind to ensure consistent quality and taste; help establish presentation techniques and assisting in planning menus; ensure proper use and maintenance of equipment; and ensure proper safety and sanitation in kitchens and lunchrooms.

The program aims to reach all Kentucky schools participating in the National School Lunch Program, increase support of the Farm to School movement, and reduce hunger in Kentucky.

Deadline is noon on Oct. 20. For more information, contact Autumn Brewer at 502-564-1133 or Autumn.Brewer@ky.gov.

▪  Alfalfa, 141 East Main Street, will celebrate Spanish cuisine for International Night on Wednesday. From 5:30 to 9 p.m., you can get Basque chicken, seafood paella, pasta olivada available with chicken, potato tortilla and escalivado (roasted eggplant, roasted yellow and red peppers, roasted tomato, roasted scallions and roasted potato skins with garlic olive oil drizzle served with crumbled goat cheese, green olives, romesco sauce and toast points.) Next Wednesday: Polish night.

▪  The Kentucky Guild of Brewers and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture are teaming up to release five limited-edition, Kentucky Proud-infused beers. The first, a peach sour saison brewed by Against the Grain in Louisville with Kentucky Proud peaches from Mulberry Orchard in Shelbyville, was released Monday. There will be a tasting at 6 p.m. Oct. 17 at Ethereal Brewing in Lexington. Four more beers will be released throughout the fall, with the next release set for Nov. 2 at Monnik Beer Co. in Louisville and Paducah Brew Werks, made using paw paw fruit from the Kentucky State Land Grant Program.

Other releases will be from Great Flood Brewing Co. in Louisville and Ei8htball Brewing in Newport, using pecans from Kight’s Pecan Orchard in McCraken County; Goodwood Brewing in Louisville and White Squirrel Brewery in Bowling Green, using hemp seed oil from Kentucky Hemp Works in Christian County; and Gordon Biersch in Louisville and Apocalypse Brew Works in Louisville, using sorghum from Townsend Sorghum Mill in Montgomery County.

▪  From Oct. 22 to 27, Jim Embry of Lexington and Richmond again will represent Kentucky and the United States at the 2016 Terra Madre/Salone del Gusto, a global slow-food conference in Torino, Italy, dedicated to diverse food cultures, sustainability and biodiversity. To showcase the state, Embry is taking Kentucky products including small bottles of bourbon; seeds, honey and jam from the Berea College farm store; shopping bags from Good Foods Co-op; Mom Bea’s Honey from his own family farm in Greenville; popcorn and herbal teas from Salamander Springs Permaculture Farm near Berea; and more.

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