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Disgraced attorney Eric Conn reaches deal with prosecutors. Details still secret.

Becoming ‘Mr. Social Security’: The bizarre story of fugitive lawyer Eric Conn

Fugitive lawyer Eric C. Conn was convicted in a fraud scheme that could have cost the government more than $550 million in Social Security payments. Here's how the onetime king of Eastern Kentucky disability cases ended up on the FBI's most-wanted
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Fugitive lawyer Eric C. Conn was convicted in a fraud scheme that could have cost the government more than $550 million in Social Security payments. Here's how the onetime king of Eastern Kentucky disability cases ended up on the FBI's most-wanted

Disbarred Eastern Kentucky attorney Eric C. Conn has reached a deal with prosecutors to resolve all charges against him, according to a court motion.

Conn faces four escape-related charges in one case and 18 charges in another that include mail and wire fraud, money laundering and destroying evidence in a federal investigation.

The charges in the 18-count indictment carry a cumulative 255-year sentence for a conviction on all charges.

The agreement to resolve the charges presumably would include a better deal for Conn, 58.

Conn had already reached a deal to plead guilty to the four charges alleging he fled to Central America last year while awaiting sentencing in a related case, according to a court document.

However, his attorney, Willis G. Coffey, filed a motion Tuesday saying that Conn and prosecutors had reached an agreement to resolve both the escape and fraud cases.

The motion did not include details of the deal.

U.S. District Judge Danny C. Reeves scheduled a hearing June 4 to take Conn’s guilty plea.

Conn, who lived in Pikeville and had an office in Floyd County, was once one of the most prolific Social Security disability attorneys in the nation.

However, he pleaded guilty last year to being part of a conspiracy in which he used false evidence of physical or mental disabilities in clients’ claims for benefits, paid medical professionals to sign the claims with little scrutiny, and bribed a Social Security judge to approve benefits.

The conspiracy involved thousands of cases.

Conn pleaded guilty last year on two related charges.

While on home incarceration awaiting sentencing, he cut the electronic monitor from his ankle and fled to Mexico, then made his way to Honduras. Police caught him there in December after he’d been gone six months.

A former employee of Conn's, Curtis Wyatt, pleaded guilty to helping him escape. He has not been sentenced.

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