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Schools close to avoid chill

Fayette County Public Schools called off Friday classes because of a forecast of "temperatures below zero and a wind chill approaching negative teens." Officials said it might be the first time in at least 20 years that schools were closed because of low temperatures alone, and not dangerous roads. Many local districts, including Scott, Jessamine, Bourbon, Clark, Madison and Woodford counties, also will be closed.

YOU THINK THIS IS COLD?

PHOTOS, TIPS, RECORDS AND THE COLD, HARD FACTS, INSIDE ON PAGE A4.

You think this is cold? Part One: Friday morning's forecast of a low temperature of zero or below in Lexington is no reason to rush to the record books. The state's all-time recorded low was -37 degrees, recorded in Shelbyville, on Jan. 19, 1994.

Accept no triple-dog dares: In temperatures this cold, your tongue really can freeze to a flagpole. The moisture on your tongue freezes to the pole, creating an unpleasant bond. A more practical concern: A dog's tongue can freeze to a metal water bowl. Bring Spot and his bowl inside.

Skating on thin ice: Ponds can freeze in this kind of weather, but you should stay off the ice cover unless there is a prolonged cold spell. It's a good idea for farmers to move livestock away from icy ponds.

You think this is cold? Part Two: The coldest temperature ever recorded in Lexington is -21.2 on Jan. 24, 1963. The Herald-Leader reported at the time that the low came at 12:30 a.m., and that the temperature rose by 1.2 degrees in the next half hour — "but the slight warming was noticeable only to the weatherman."

You can always put on more clothes, but you can take off only so much. The all-time high in Kentucky was 114 degrees in Greensburg on July 28, 1930.

At 42 below, still in school: In International Falls, Minn., the temperature hit a record -42 this week. But, as The Daily Journal reported, "the community known as the Icebox of the Nation goes on about its business." Schools have been open, but will be closed Friday because the wind has picked up.

Wrap up tight; don't let the frost bite: With the conditions expected Friday morning, zero degrees and 5 mph wind, skin can freeze in 30 minutes. If the wind kicks up to 15 mph, it takes only 10 minutes.

Room at the inn: A record 278 people came to the Hope Center Wednesday night, and at least that many were expected Thursday night. Two churches helped with overflow. The Catholic Action Center expected a record Thursday night. The Salvation Army has been at capacity. The Catholic Action Center, 400 East Fifth Street, needs food, blankets, warm socks and cold weather gear. The Salvation Army, 736 West Main Street, needs sleeping bags and pillows, and hats, gloves and coats for children. The Hope Center, 360 West Loudon Avenue, needs men's long underwear, cold-weather gear and food.

Take pity on pets: All manner of cutesy winter clothing is available these days for dogs. But, for both your pets' well-being and self-esteem, bring them inside in this kind of weather.

Buzz up!AddThisemail this story to a friend E-Mail print story Print Reprint or licenseText Size:tool nameclosetool goes hereNews - Latest NewsFriday, Jan. 16, 2009Comments (0) | Recommend (0)For a chill down your spine, consider these facts

Schools close to avoid chill

Fayette County Public Schools called off Friday classes because of a forecast of "temperatures below zero and a wind chill approaching negative teens." Officials said it might be the first time in at least 20 years that schools were closed because of low temperatures alone, and not dangerous roads. Many local districts, including Scott, Jessamine, Bourbon, Clark, Madison and Woodford counties, also will be closed.

A PET CONCERNColdCharles Bertram

Charles Bertram | STF - A duck walked on the frozen pond in the Woodfield Subdivision at the corner of Tates Creek Road and Forest Lake Dr. in Lexington, Ky., Thursday, January 15, 2009. Temperatures are expected to dip below zero tonight. Staff Photo by Charles Bertram090115justinads063David Stephenson | Staff

David Stephenson | Staff | STF - A mother beagle and her pups snuggled behind a wood stove, keeping warm at the farm of David and Monica Hufana in Carlisle, Ky., on Thursday, January 15, 2009. Photo by David Stephenson | StaffColdCharles Bertram

Charles Bertram | STF - Students walked crossed Rose St. in the bitter cold near noon on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., Thursday, January 15, 2009. Temperatures are expected to dip below zero tonight. Staff Photo by Charles BertramCLICK FOR MORE PHOTOS

* Cold * 090115justinads063 * Cold

*

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YOU THINK

THIS IS COLD?

PHOTOS, TIPS, RECORDS AND THE COLD, HARD FACTS, INSIDE ON PAGE A4.

You think this is cold? Part One: Friday morning's forecast of a low temperature of zero or below in Lexington is no reason to rush to the record books. The state's all-time recorded low was -37 degrees, recorded in Shelbyville, on Jan. 19, 1994.

Accept no triple-dog dares: In temperatures this cold, your tongue really can freeze to a flagpole. The moisture on your tongue freezes to the pole, creating an unpleasant bond. A more practical concern: A dog's tongue can freeze to a metal water bowl. Bring Spot and his bowl inside.

Skating on thin ice: Ponds can freeze in this kind of weather, but you should stay off the ice cover unless there is a prolonged cold spell. It's a good idea for farmers to move livestock away from icy ponds.

You think this is cold? Part Two: The coldest temperature ever recorded in Lexington is -21.2 on Jan. 24, 1963. The Herald-Leader reported at the time that the low came at 12:30 a.m., and that the temperature rose by 1.2 degrees in the next half hour — "but the slight warming was noticeable only to the weatherman."

You can always put on more clothes, but you can take off only so much. The all-time high in Kentucky was 114 degrees in Greensburg on July 28, 1930.

At 42 below, still in school: In International Falls, Minn., the temperature hit a record -42 this week. But, as The Daily Journal reported, "the community known as the Icebox of the Nation goes on about its business." Schools have been open, but will be closed Friday because the wind has picked up.

Wrap up tight; don't let the frost bite: With the conditions expected Friday morning, zero degrees and 5 mph wind, skin can freeze in 30 minutes. If the wind kicks up to 15 mph, it takes only 10 minutes.

Room at the inn: A record 278 people came to the Hope Center Wednesday night, and at least that many were expected Thursday night. Two churches helped with overflow. The Catholic Action Center expected a record Thursday night. The Salvation Army has been at capacity. The Catholic Action Center, 400 East Fifth Street, needs food, blankets, warm socks and cold weather gear. The Salvation Army, 736 West Main Street, needs sleeping bags and pillows, and hats, gloves and coats for children. The Hope Center, 360 West Loudon Avenue, needs men's long underwear, cold-weather gear and food.

Take pity on pets: All manner of cutesy winter clothing is available these days for dogs. But, for both your pets' well-being and self-esteem, bring them inside in this kind of weather.

Buzz up!AddThisemail this story to a friend E-Mail print story Print Reprint or licenseText Size:tool nameclosetool goes hereNews - Latest NewsFriday, Jan. 16, 2009Comments (0) | Recommend (0)For a chill down your spine, consider these facts

Schools close to avoid chill

Fayette County Public Schools called off Friday classes because of a forecast of "temperatures below zero and a wind chill approaching negative teens." Officials said it might be the first time in at least 20 years that schools were closed because of low temperatures alone, and not dangerous roads. Many local districts, including Scott, Jessamine, Bourbon, Clark, Madison and Woodford counties, also will be closed.

A PET CONCERNColdCharles Bertram

Charles Bertram | STF - A duck walked on the frozen pond in the Woodfield Subdivision at the corner of Tates Creek Road and Forest Lake Dr. in Lexington, Ky., Thursday, January 15, 2009. Temperatures are expected to dip below zero tonight. Staff Photo by Charles Bertram090115justinads063David Stephenson | Staff

David Stephenson | Staff | STF - A mother beagle and her pups snuggled behind a wood stove, keeping warm at the farm of David and Monica Hufana in Carlisle, Ky., on Thursday, January 15, 2009. Photo by David Stephenson | StaffColdCharles Bertram

Charles Bertram | STF - Students walked crossed Rose St. in the bitter cold near noon on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., Thursday, January 15, 2009. Temperatures are expected to dip below zero tonight. Staff Photo by Charles BertramCLICK FOR MORE PHOTOS

* Cold * 090115justinads063 * Cold

*

Quantcast

You think this is cold? Part One: Friday morning's forecast of a low temperature of zero or below in Lexington is no reason to rush to the record books. The state's all-time recorded low was -37 degrees, recorded in Shelbyville, on Jan. 19, 1994.

Accept no triple-dog dares: In temperatures this cold, your tongue really can freeze to a flagpole. The moisture on your tongue freezes to the pole, creating an unpleasant bond. A more practical concern: A dog's tongue can freeze to a metal water bowl. Bring Spot and his bowl inside.

Skating on thin ice: Ponds can freeze in this kind of weather, but you should stay off the ice cover unless there is a prolonged cold spell. It's a good idea for farmers to move livestock away from icy ponds.

You think this is cold? Part Two: The coldest temperature ever recorded in Lexington is -21.2 on Jan. 24, 1963. The Herald-Leader reported at the time that the low came at 12:30 a.m., and that the temperature rose by 1.2 degrees in the next half hour — "but the slight warming was noticeable only to the weatherman."

You can always put on more clothes, but you can take off only so much. The all-time high in Kentucky was 114 degrees in Greensburg on July 28, 1930.

At 42 below, still in school: In International Falls, Minn., the temperature hit a record -42 this week. But, as The Daily Journal reported, "the community known as the Icebox of the Nation goes on about its business." Schools have been open, but will be closed Friday because the wind has picked up.

Wrap up tight; don't let the frost bite: With the conditions expected Friday morning, zero degrees and 5 mph wind, skin can freeze in 30 minutes. If the wind kicks up to 15 mph, it takes only 10 minutes.

Room at the inn: A record 278 people came to the Hope Center Wednesday night, and at least that many were expected Thursday night. Two churches helped with overflow. The Catholic Action Center expected a record Thursday night. The Salvation Army has been at capacity. The Catholic Action Center, 400 East Fifth Street, needs food, blankets, warm socks and cold weather gear. The Salvation Army, 736 West Main Street, needs sleeping bags and pillows, and hats, gloves and coats for children. The Hope Center, 360 West Loudon Avenue, needs men's long underwear, cold-weather gear and food.

Take pity on pets: All manner of cutesy winter clothing is available these days for dogs. But, for both your pets' well-being and self-esteem, bring them inside in this kind of weather.

Information for this article came from Keys Arnold of the University of Kentucky's Agricultural Weather Center, from The Kentucky Climate Center at Western Kentucky University and from reporter Jim Warren and researcher Lu-Ann Farrar. It was written by Andy Mead.

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